ecofeminism


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ecofeminism

(ˌiːkəʊˈfɛmɪˌnɪzəm)
n
(Environmental Science) a belief in and a movement that subscribes to the hypothesis that connects environmentalism and feminism
Translations
écoféminisme
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Her theological work, especially Ecofeminism in Latin America (Orbis Books, 2006) established her unique voice--still a gringa of sorts, living in Santiago, Chile, but a global feminist actively engaged in Latin American struggles for life.
Beyond the Victim/Agent Dichotomy: A Discussion of Ecofeminism, Intersectionality, and Climate Change.
Despite the vast creative responses feminism gains from Nigerian writers, ecofeminism has enjoyed little attention.
Ecofeminism is based on the premise that "both person and planet are threatened by the same enemy" (Roszak, 1979, p.
Employing ecofeminist lenses to survey traumatic geographies, I show that it is useful to bring together these perspectives for the purpose of critically considering how the settings function in YA sexual assault narratives, especially how they affect the female protagonist survivors, and what the more empowering possibilities offered by ecofeminism can lend to examinations of such texts.
Heller, for example, became a prominent figure of social ecofeminism in the Left Greens and was a good friend of Bookchin's from 1984 until his death in 2006.
Melissa Leach's introductory paper on the history of gender approaches includes a strident critique of ecofeminism, while also calling attention to the need for more critical analysis of women's time and labor constraints, as well as the heterogeneity of gender relations across different contexts.
Germaine Greer: Expect a candid, enlightening and entertaining encounter with the outspoken broadcaster and feminist icon in a show entitled Women for Life on Earth: The Inevitability of Ecofeminism Tomorrow, Midland Arts Centre, Birmingham.
We respect all voices (i.e., Indigenomics and ecofeminism).
She puts forward that ecofeminism is a theory that borrows from various strands of feminist studies and activism, and cites some of its origins: "peace movements, labor movements, women's healthcare, and the anti-nuclear, environmental, and animal liberation movements" (p.
Their conflicts reprise one of the major concerns of ecofeminism that examines the "important connections between the oppression of women and the destruction and misuse of nonhuman nature within male-dominated cultures." (4) This general formulation does not specify the important connections, but Karla Armbruster adds, "central to the ecofeminist agenda is the goal of individual, social, and ideological change--specifically, change that will improve the cultural standing of women and nature." (5) She implies that the hierarchy of dualisms that divide the world and valorize the male side, such as nature/female and culture/male, has to be dissolved to allow more nuanced interconnections.
The topics include women's developmental patterns and implications for leadership, the international reproductive rights movement, women in sustainable development and ecofeminism, leading from the fringes: women's paths to political power, the evolution of women leaders in the film industry, and Alice Milliat and the Women's World Games.