ecofeminist


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ecofeminist

(ˌiːkəʊˈfɛmɪnɪst)
n
(Environmental Science) a person who subscribes to the theory of ecofeminism
adj
(Environmental Science) relating to or promoting the theory of ecofeminism
Translations
écoféministe
References in periodicals archive ?
"A Better World Starts Here" should be considered as essential reading for anyone wishing to find empowerment and guidance, the stories of activists such as Michelle Carrera (Chilis on Wheels), activist poet Judy Grahn, Sarah Rafael Garcia (Barrio Writers), vegan and ecofeminist writer Carol J.
However, while reviving established critical practices related to women's studies and gender studies, the book is also enriched by a variety of methodologies that include food studies, spatial and ecofeminist theories, and postcolonial studies, to name just a few.
(2017), "'Neither Homeland Nor Exile are Words': 'Situated Knowledge' in the Works of Palestinian and Native American Writers"; "Rethinking Resistance: An Ecofeminist Approach to Anti-Colonialism in Louise Erdrich, Future Home of the Living God and Larissa Sansour and Oreet Ashery, The Novel of Novel and Vovel," D.A.
Their topics include perceiving the relationship in nature: an ecofeminist reading of La Legend des Fleurs, the carnivalesque theater of revolt in her Folie, La Danse sur le volcan: Marie Chauvet tells "her-story" of theater in Saint-Dominique at the dawn of the revolution, the crime narrative as social commentary: justice and power in her "Birds of Prey" and Lucha Corpi's Eulogy for a Brown Angel, and "To Fire:" a process of dramatically adapting depictions of 18th-century Haiti.
In the quest to extrapolate the division of mind and body and its borders, and also the idea of "human nature," Maria Clara Dias invites us to reflect on a more inclusive justice compatible with the ideals of a universalist moral conception--what she calls " Perspective of Runs (PdF) "--in hers The Functionings Approach: a decolonial ecofeminist point of view.
(2) Heather F.aton, Introducing Ecofeminist Theologies (London: T & T Clark International, 2005), 102.
By utilizing the aesthetic appeal and sacramentalizing nature of cinematic masterpieces such as Benh Zeitlin's Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012) (1) to inform thought-provoking ecofeminist theologies such as Elizabeth Johnson's in Ask the Beasts: Darwin and the God of Love (2014), (2) one approaches the moral imperative to care for creation with renewed insight into the shared human experience of being a beast, being, and beholder of God's glorious world.
The novel doesn't lead with its politics, but it still functions beautifully as an ecofeminist allegory.
Ecofeminist therapy thus adopts and integrates perspectives, strategies, methods, and practices from ecotherapy (applied ecopsychology) and feminist therapy.
This call for a notion of interconnection, intra-action, and assemblage is also found in the recent works of Karen Barad (5), and Jane Bennett, echoing an ecofeminist articulation.
Their conflicts reprise one of the major concerns of ecofeminism that examines the "important connections between the oppression of women and the destruction and misuse of nonhuman nature within male-dominated cultures." (4) This general formulation does not specify the important connections, but Karla Armbruster adds, "central to the ecofeminist agenda is the goal of individual, social, and ideological change--specifically, change that will improve the cultural standing of women and nature." (5) She implies that the hierarchy of dualisms that divide the world and valorize the male side, such as nature/female and culture/male, has to be dissolved to allow more nuanced interconnections.