ecofeminism

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ecofeminism

(ˌiːkəʊˈfɛmɪˌnɪzəm)
n
(Environmental Science) a belief in and a movement that subscribes to the hypothesis that connects environmentalism and feminism
Translations
écoféminisme
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It is interesting to note that while scientists were thinking humans too small, ecofeminists and writers such as Ursula K.
Ecofeminists have focused primarily on the theoretical and empirical links between women, race, SES and children and environmental degradation such as deforestation, pollution, pesticide usage, etc.
For instance, referring to Lawrence Buell's 2005 The Future of Environmental Criticism: Environmental Crisis and Literary Imagination, one of the best-read books on ecocriticism, Terry Gifford takes Buell to task stating that ecofeminists will "feel that Buell ignores new developments such as the work of Catriona Sandilands on .
Not unreasonably, what is often critiqued by ecofeminists and goddess feminists alike is the Biblical licence given 'Man'/humanity to exploit Nature and its creatures.
Vegan and vegetarian ecofeminists are now arguing that the anti-essentialist backlash against ecofeminism is motivated by a deeper backlash against ecofeminism's defense of inter-species justice (Gaard "'Ecofeminism' Revisited.
In exploring what ecofeminists recognize as interwoven forms of domination, Feminism and the Environment investigates the earth's health and future in the context of women's life experiences, focusing on both women's perceived responsibilities as caretakers of the land and the limitations imposed upon them as owners and managers of the land.
Warren, one of many ecofeminists whose research concerns "the important connections between how one treats women, people of color, and the underclass on one hand and how one treats the nonhuman natural environment on the other" (Warren qtd.
For example, ecofeminists, with an understanding of relationality akin to the theory of internal relations (Salleh, 2000: 121), identify within deep ecology a relational blancmange on the insideness of an expansive sense of Self; a kind of internalised blancmange of world that is under the mandate of the internaliser.
Over the last 30 years, ecofeminists have urged us to include the struggle to preserve the natural environment in our fight for women's equality (see Susan Mann).
Though a variety of perspectives exists, ecofeminists, in general, see connections between how the world is viewed and treated and how women are viewed and treated, making parallels between ecology and feminism.
Ecofeminists agree that the marginalization and exploitation of both nature and women are a consequence of historically male-dominated societies.
Scee points out that, contrary to some theories by ecofeminists, she found more similarities than dissimilarities in gender in regard to this activity, which has also blurred the lines between classes and work and hobby.