economism


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economism

(ɪˈkɒnəˌmɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy)
a. a political theory that regards economics as the main factor in society, ignoring or reducing to simplistic economic terms other factors such as culture, nationality, etc
b. the belief that the main aim of a political group, trade union, etc, is to improve the material living standards of its members
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (often capital) (in Tsarist Russia) a political belief that the sole concern of the working classes should be with improving their living conditions and not with political reforms
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

economism

a theory or doctrine that attaches principal importance to economic goals. — economist, n.
See also: Economics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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In place of the arbitrary "economism" of socialists and the free marketeers' faith in untrammeled economic growth, she envisions a human society modeled on interdependent self-regulating natural systems.
But the agency has increasingly given a pride of place to "economism" the imperative "to attract tourists, stimulate inward investment, boost exports and, attract students and workers" rather than the essential characteristics, values, and attributes of the country.
Law professor James Kwak documents this effort in his book "Economism: Bad Economics and the Rise of Inequality." But in the 1990s, the political tide within the profession began to turn.
James Kwak is a professor at the University of Connecticut School of Law and the author, most recently, of Economism. Before law school, he cofounded Guidewire Software.
She argues that the mathematizing of economics and placing undue stress on positivism deemphasize social relationships and nonmarket values and that economics shifted from its original theologically informed roots to economism. Hinson-Hasty then turns her attention to a critique of two social philosophies of wealth creation--social developmentalism and neoliberalism--and faults both for having an individualistic approach that ignores the common good.
The irony is that this is a variation on the same basic error of which socialism is guilty--what Pope John Paul II called "economism," the reduction of human life to its economic aspect.
All of these problems, created through "the surrender of culture to technology," are intensified by the dominance of economism, the "fundamentalism of the market" and the "deification of profit," and subjugate the souls of children to the "attitude of having," as well as to materialism and utilitarianism.
On this, Buckley is at odds with what movement conservatism has promoted over the last 30-odd years, which is a pure moralism alongside a theoretically pure free-market economism, each restricted to its own categorical silo.
Unfortunately, as my co-author James Kwak points out in his recent book, Economism: Bad Economics and the Rise of Inequality, Econ 101 is so far from being the whole story that it could actually be considered misleading -- at least as a guide to sensible policymaking.
Buckley, a scholar who also took an active hand in politics as a speechwriter for the Trump campaign of two years ago, examines how conservatives lost their feeling for their fellow citizens by subordinating their commitments to Christianity and the nation to a heartless economism. He points the way to a conservative party for the working class.
"Economism," where every social, political and cultural factor is reduced to an economic one, is at the very heart of Donald Trump's canon.