economist


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

e·con·o·mist

 (ĭ-kŏn′ə-mĭst)
n.
1. A specialist in economics.
2. Archaic An economical person.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

economist

(ɪˈkɒnəmɪst)
n
1. (Economics) a specialist in economics
2. archaic a person who advocates or practises frugality
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•con•o•mist

(ɪˈkɒn ə mɪst)

n.
1. a specialist in the science of economics.
2. Archaic. a thrifty or frugal person.
[1580–90]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.economist - an expert in the science of economicseconomist - an expert in the science of economics
economics profession - the body of professional economists
econometrician, econometrist - an economist who uses statistical and mathematical methods
macroeconomic expert, macroeconomist - an economist who specializes in macroeconomics
microeconomic expert, microeconomist - an economist who specializes in microeconomics
monetarist - an advocate of the theory that economic fluctuations are caused by increases or decreases in the supply of money
social scientist - someone expert in the study of human society and its personal relationships
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

economist

noun
Quotations
"Economists set themselves too easy, too useless a task if in tempestuous seasons they can only tell us that when the storm is long past the ocean will be flat again" [John Maynard Keynes A Tract on Monetary Reform]
"If all economists were laid end to end, they would not reach a conclusion" [George Bernard Shaw]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
عالِم إقْتِصادعَالِمُ اِقْتِصَاديّ
ekonom
økonom
VolkswirtschaftlerWirtschaftswissenschaftler
taloustieteilijäekonomisti
ekonomist
közgazdász
hagfræîingur
経済学者
경제학자
ekonomistaekonomistka
ekonóm
ekonomist
ekonom
นักเศรษฐศาสตร์
nhà kinh tế học

economist

[ɪˈkɒnəmɪst] Neconomista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

economist

[ɪˈkɒnəmɪst] néconomiste mf
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

economist

nWirtschaftswissenschaftler(in) m(f); (= social economist)Volkswirt(in) m(f), → Volkswirtschaftler(in) m(f); (in management studies) → Betriebswirt(in) m(f), → Betriebswirtschaftler(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

economist

[ɪˈkɒnəmɪst] neconomista m/f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

economy

(iˈkonəmi) noun
1. the thrifty, careful management of money etc to avoid waste. Please use the water with economy; We must make economies in household spending.
2. organization of money and resources. the country's economy; household economy.
economic (iːkəˈnomik) adjective
1. of or concerned with (an) economy. the country's economic future.
2. likely to bring a profit. an economic rent.
economical (iːkəˈnomikəl) adjective
thrifty; not extravagant. This car is very economical on petrol.
ˌecoˈnomically adverb
economics (iːkəˈnomiks) noun singular
the study of production and distribution of money and goods. He is studying economics.
eˈconomist noun
a person who is an expert in economics.
eˈconomize, eˈconomise verb
to spend money or goods carefully. We must economize on fuel.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

economist

عَالِمُ اِقْتِصَاديّ ekonom økonom Volkswirtschaftler οικονομολόγος economista taloustieteilijä économiste ekonomist economista 経済学者 경제학자 econoom økonom ekonomista economista экономист ekonom นักเศรษฐศาสตร์ ekonomist nhà kinh tế học 经济学家
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
But no amount of lubberly book-jargon can disguise a fact well calculated to afflict the soul of every sound economist. It is not likely that the Mediterranean will ever behold a battle with a greater issue; but when the time comes for another historical fight its bottom will be enriched as never before by a quantity of jagged scrap-iron, paid for at pretty nearly its weight of gold by the deluded populations inhabiting the isles and continents of this planet.
She lives in reputation at the polite end of the town, and is so good an economist, that she spends three times the income of her fortune, without running into debt.
I have not set down half of the virtues that are vested in a good courier, but I think I have set down a sufficiency of them to show that an irritable man who can afford one and does not employ him is not a wise economist. My courier was the worst one in Europe, yet he was a good deal better than none at all.
She could not enter into the wrongs of an economist, but she felt all the injuries of beauty in Mrs.
"In economics all roads lead to Socialism, although in nine cases out of ten, so far, the economist doesn't recognize his destination, and incurs the malediction pronounced by Jeremiah on those who justify the wicked for reward.
Indeed every good economist and manager of a household must know how cheap and yet how amiable these professions are, and what a flavour they give to the most homely dish in life.
Having satisfied himself, on his father's death, that his mother had a right of settlement in Coketown, this excellent young economist had asserted that right for her with such a steadfast adherence to the principle of the case, that she had been shut up in the workhouse ever since.
It laid bare the hypocritical apologies of economists. It proved, incontrovertibly, the disastrous effects of machinery and division of labour; the concentration of capital and land in a few hands; overproduction and crises; it pointed out the inevitable ruin of the petty bourgeois and peasant, the misery of the proletariat, the anarchy in production, the crying inequalities in the distribution of wealth, the industrial war of extermination between nations, the dissolution of old moral bonds, of the old family relations, of the old nationalities.
Yet it was only from that point of view that he considered every laborer, though in many points he differed from the economists and had his own theory of the wage-fund, which he expounded to Levin.
The American will know how to appreciate the importance of this opinion, in relation to the house in question, when he is told that it was written by one of those inspired moralists, and profound constitutional lawyers, and ingenious political economists, who daily teach their fellow creatures how to give practical illustrations of the mandates of the Bible, how to discriminate in vexed questions arising from the national compact, and how to manage their private affairs in such a way as to escape the quicksands that have wrecked their own.
But as I cannot hope for a wholly sympathetic audience--as there may be monks, misogynists, political economists, and other professedly hard-hearted persons present among those whom I now address--I think it best to keep to safe generalities, and to describe my love-making in as few sentences as the vast, though soft, importance of the subject will allow me to use.
The present book, as a brief sketch of English Literature rather strictly defined, has necessarily disregarded the scientists, economists, and philosophers whose writings did much to mold the course of thought during the Victorian period.