economistic

Related to economistic: economics, ecumenism, determinism

economistic

(ɪˌkɒnəˈmɪstɪk)
adj
(Economics) of or relating to economics or finances: economistic issues.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The trouble is, aggregate indicators like the budget deficit, GDP growth rates and foreign reserves are too abstract, too economistic to capture the social and political dimensions and implications of the economy.
Then there is the abstracted economistic justification for putting criminals to death.
"Economistic reasoning dominates our age" (Ibid 259).
Of course, some economists have the usual 'economistic' attitude: Let new investors, preferably foreign, come in.
(13) "On Pushkin" took shape at the apex of Lifshitz's High Stalinist decade, and falls squarely within his conception of the politics of literary criticism at that time as a "battle on two fronts"--against "vulgarized," economistic Marxist interpretations of art., on the one hand, and against "liberalism" (in Lifshitz, an unthinking, self-satisfied celebration of canon), on the other.
As in Western countries, the discourse of lifelong learning policy has tended to focus on economistic measures and employment outcomes rather than education that focusses on learning across a lifespan, through various stages of their life and is viewed as a 'social good'.
Constantine Papadopoulos in turn argues that, in order to understand the reasons behind the Greek economy's inability to recover sooner from its 8-year recession, analysis must focus on the institutional, political and cultural traits of the country rather than take a primarily 'economistic' approach and simply blame 'excessive austerity' and/or the euro.
The de Gaulle administration conceded most of the workers' economistic demands, including vast pay increments, and the PCF thereafter used its clout to persuade them to return to work.
One noted exception to this "economistic" perspective is George Borjas--author of a stream of important research articles on the economics of immigration and a recent, influential book: We Wanted Workers: Unraveling the Immigration Narrative (2016).
Therefore, it should be pointed out that, based on a systematic and teleological interpretation of the Federal Constitution of 1988, with the lens directed to ordinary legislation, invoking the best doctrine and the signs of the jurisprudence of the Federal Supreme Court, it is concluded, in summary, that rural property in Brazil, although it may appear as "productive" from the economistic point of view, according to the art.
This dispute over the value of the transition programme is a telling illustration of economistic thinking in relation to parenting and education.