ecotoxic


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ecotoxic

(ˌiːkəʊˈtɒksɪk)
adj
(Environmental Science) harmful to animals, plants, or the environment
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Implementation of a minimal set of biological test to assess the ecotoxic effect of effluents from landbased marine fish farms Ecotox.
The widespread use of anthelmintics has restricted the use of most chemicals, as evidenced by the occurrence of resistance, food residues and ecotoxic action (Cezar et al., 2008).
However, it is ecotoxic and cause chromosomal fractures and has histopathological effects like multi-organ tissue injury [8].
The sorption characteristics of biochar may reduce the bioavailability of undesired elements and reduce ecotoxic effects (Karer et al.
Furthermore, many studies have provided evidence that ATL could inhibit the growth of human embryonic cells and was ecotoxic to freshwater species.
The lead based stabilisers are classified like toxic for the reproduction, harmful, dangerous for the environment (ecotoxic) and presenting a danger of cumulated effects [1].
The results suggest that the FDA assay, in combination with the soil burial test, provides a simple and reliable method for monitoring the biodegradation processes and the putative ecotoxic effects of bioplastics in soil.
Kamala and D.S.S Raj, Assessing risk of heavy metals from consuming food grown on sewage irrigated soils and food chain transfer, Ecotoxic. Environ.
Bacterial strains capable of degrading complex hydrocarbons present in the environment have a potential to be used as an effective tool for removing ecotoxic compounds.
Concretes containing biomass ashes: Mechanical, chemical, and ecotoxic performances, Construction and Building Materials 48: 457-463.
Nickel (II) is also found to be an embryo toxin; a teratogen which makes the removal of this ecotoxic species a serious concern.