ectothermic


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ec·to·ther·mic

 (ĕk′tə-thûr′mĭk) also ec·to·ther·mal (ĕk′tə-thûr′məl)
adj.
Of or relating to an organism that regulates its body temperature largely by exchanging heat with its surroundings; cold-blooded.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ectothermic

(ˌɛktəʊˈθɜːmɪk)
adj
(of all animals except birds and mammals) having a body temperature that varies with the temperature of the surroundings
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ectothermic - of animals except birds and mammals; having body temperature that varies with the environment
cold-blooded - having cold blood (in animals whose body temperature is not internally regulated)
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References in periodicals archive ?
The warm water and vegetative cover provide excellent breeding habitat for amphibians and other ectothermic organisms.
The commonest pattern of sexual size dimorphism in ectothermic organisms is a bias towards larger females (Fairbairn 1997).
All squamates including snakes are ectothermic and amniotic with overlapping scales.
This is explained by the general model of energy-limited tolerance to stress (Sokolova, 2013) and the more widely known but controversial special case: the oxygen and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) model, which was developed primarily with data from arctic and temperate ectothermic organisms (Portner and Knust, 2007; Portner, 2010; Jutfelt et al., 2018).
Snakes being ectothermic, experience variation in oxygen affinity.
Environmental conditions play a key role in the condition of eggs and larvae in ectothermic invertebrates (Benzie 1998).
The most widely recognized generalization for body size is Bergmann's rule: the observation that within species or among closely related species--endothermic and some ectothermic vertebrates tend to be larger in relatively cool climates (Ashton2002; Angilletta et al.--2004; de Queiroz & Ashton--2004); and this theory as well has been widely supported in amphibians (Olalla-Tarraga & Rodriguez--2007; Ma--Tong--& Lu2009; Liao--Lu--Shen--& Hu--2010a; Liao & Lu--2010).
Microhabitat selection is important for small ectothermic animals including insects (Ahnesjo and Forsman 2006, Gardiner and Hassall 2009), and for herbivores with specific diets (including those that sequester unpalatable chemicals from plants for their own protection against predators; Sword et al.
Thermoregulatory behavior of ectothermic organisms is an important physiological response used to determine the temperature range under which the physiological and metabolic processes are optimum (Bellgraph et al., 2010; Ward et al., 2010; Xu et al, 2015).
It is also reported that climate warming effects stream ecosystems with mostly ectothermic inhabitants found in risky dendritic networks at very high level (Isaak et al., 2013).
de Boer et al., "The hypertrabeclated (noncompacted) left ventricle is different from the ventricle of embryos and ectothermic vertebrates," Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, vol.
Because the insect is ectothermic, the fundamental frequency can vary around 200 Hz, typically from 160 to 230 Hz [21].