edified


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ed·i·fy

 (ĕd′ə-fī′)
tr.v. ed·i·fied, ed·i·fy·ing, ed·i·fies
To instruct especially so as to encourage intellectual, moral, or spiritual improvement.

[Middle English edifien, from Old French edifier, from Late Latin aedificāre, to instruct spiritually, from Latin, to build; see edifice.]

ed′i·fi′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.edified - instructed and encouraged in moral, intellectual, and spiritual improvement
enlightened - having knowledge and spiritual insight
References in classic literature ?
And some want to be edified and raised up, and call it virtue: and others want to be cast down,--and likewise call it virtue.
Claude had confided him to that same college of Torchi where he had passed his early years in study and meditation; and it was a grief to him that this sanctuary, formerly edified by the name of Frollo, should to-day be scandalized by it.
"I have seen Justin Lebasset die, dear Arribas, and was touched, edified, to the bottom of my soul.
Having at length finished his laboured harangue, with which the audience, though it had greatly raised their attention and admiration, were not much edified, as they really understood not a single syllable of all he had said, he proceeded to business, which he was more expeditious in finishing, than he had been in beginning.
'Oh, Christopher, how have I been edified this night!'
Topsy, with great gravity and adroitness, went through the exercise completely to Miss Ophelia's satisfaction; smoothing the sheets, patting out every wrinkle, and exhibiting, through the whole process, a gravity and seriousness with which her instructress was greatly edified. By an unlucky slip, however, a fluttering fragment of the ribbon hung out of one of her sleeves, just as she was finishing, and caught Miss Ophelia's attention.