editorialize

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ed·i·to·ri·al·ize

 (ĕd′ĭ-tôr′ē-ə-līz′)
intr.v. ed·i·to·ri·al·ized, ed·i·to·ri·al·iz·ing, ed·i·to·ri·al·iz·es
1. To express an opinion in or as if in an editorial.
2. To present an opinion in the guise of an objective report.

ed′i·to′ri·al·i·za′tion (-ə-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
ed′i·to′ri·al·i′zer n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

editorialize

(ˌɛdɪˈtɔːrɪəˌlaɪz) or

editorialise

vb (intr)
1. to express an opinion in or as in an editorial
2. to insert one's personal opinions into an otherwise objective account
ˌediˌtorialiˈzation, ˌediˌtorialiˈsation n
ˌediˈtorialˌizer, ˌediˈtorialˌiser n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ed•i•to•ri•al•ize

(ˌɛd ɪˈtɔr i əˌlaɪz, -ˈtoʊr-)

v.i. -ized, -iz•ing.
1. to set forth one's position or opinion in or as if in an editorial.
2. to inject personal interpretations or opinions into an otherwise factual account.
[1855–60, Amer.]
ed`i•to`ri•al•i•za′tion, n.
ed`i•to′ri•al•iz`er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

editorialize


Past participle: editorialized
Gerund: editorializing

Imperative
editorialize
editorialize
Present
I editorialize
you editorialize
he/she/it editorializes
we editorialize
you editorialize
they editorialize
Preterite
I editorialized
you editorialized
he/she/it editorialized
we editorialized
you editorialized
they editorialized
Present Continuous
I am editorializing
you are editorializing
he/she/it is editorializing
we are editorializing
you are editorializing
they are editorializing
Present Perfect
I have editorialized
you have editorialized
he/she/it has editorialized
we have editorialized
you have editorialized
they have editorialized
Past Continuous
I was editorializing
you were editorializing
he/she/it was editorializing
we were editorializing
you were editorializing
they were editorializing
Past Perfect
I had editorialized
you had editorialized
he/she/it had editorialized
we had editorialized
you had editorialized
they had editorialized
Future
I will editorialize
you will editorialize
he/she/it will editorialize
we will editorialize
you will editorialize
they will editorialize
Future Perfect
I will have editorialized
you will have editorialized
he/she/it will have editorialized
we will have editorialized
you will have editorialized
they will have editorialized
Future Continuous
I will be editorializing
you will be editorializing
he/she/it will be editorializing
we will be editorializing
you will be editorializing
they will be editorializing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been editorializing
you have been editorializing
he/she/it has been editorializing
we have been editorializing
you have been editorializing
they have been editorializing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been editorializing
you will have been editorializing
he/she/it will have been editorializing
we will have been editorializing
you will have been editorializing
they will have been editorializing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been editorializing
you had been editorializing
he/she/it had been editorializing
we had been editorializing
you had been editorializing
they had been editorializing
Conditional
I would editorialize
you would editorialize
he/she/it would editorialize
we would editorialize
you would editorialize
they would editorialize
Past Conditional
I would have editorialized
you would have editorialized
he/she/it would have editorialized
we would have editorialized
you would have editorialized
they would have editorialized
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.editorialize - insert personal opinions into an objective statement
animadvert, opine, sound off, speak out, speak up - express one's opinion openly and without fear or hesitation; "John spoke up at the meeting"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

editorialize

[ˌedɪˈtɔːrɪəlaɪz] VIeditorializar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

editorialize

[ˌɛdɪˈtɔːrɪəlaɪz] vi (Press) (in article) → esprimere delle opinioni (invece di limitarsi ad esporre i fatti)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Hennock argued that without a means of "policing and enforcing the requirement that the public trust granted a license be exercised in an impartial manner, it seems foolhardy to permit editorialization by licensees themselves"; she concluded that "prohibiting [such editorializing] is our only instrument for insuring the proper use of radio in the public interest" (FCC, 1949, p.
The works of Haskins that fall more closely to the "internal" typology might actually enjoy greater longevity because they include less jarring editorialization and more doctrinal "facts" that are still valuable.
Actually, such characteristics are also supporting the editorialization, promotion and display of the different contents made by the platform homepages: cf.
The rule gave FCC editorial control over all broadcast media, intimidating broadcasters into either avoiding coverage of controversial issues or avoiding editorialization. Only following the demise of the Fairness Doctrine did broadcast licensees employ commentators who communicated unfettered and robust political opinions.
He, however, said that what is yet to be analyzed in depth and detail is how this democratization of news creation, aggregation and dissemination a bottoms up process - sans editorialization is impacting both print and broadcasting newsrooms in addition to transforming the contours of the media space.
Editorialization was also common and used to try to focus the patient's response to questions about their symptoms as well as to discourage extended narratives about past symptoms (e.g., "The doctor wants to know what is bothering you today") Reflecting an advocacy approach, some interpreters asked the clinician directly about the patient's diagnosis unprompted by the patient.
My editorialization: re-reading this, her balancing "Palestinian" and "Likud" strikes me as another rookie mistake.