editorship


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ed·i·tor·ship

 (ĕd′ĭ-tər-shĭp′)
n.
The position, functions, or guidance of an editor.

ed•i•tor•ship

(ˈɛd ɪ tərˌʃɪp)

n.
1. the office or function of an editor.
2. editorial direction.
[1775–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.editorship - the position of editor
berth, billet, post, situation, position, office, place, spot - a job in an organization; "he occupied a post in the treasury"
Translations

editorship

[ˈedɪtəʃɪp] Ndirección f

editorship

n (of newspaper, magazine)Chefredaktion f; under the editorship of …unter … als Herausgeber(in)

editorship

[ˈɛdɪtəʃɪp] ndirezione f (di pubblicazione)
References in classic literature ?
At the end of three working years, two of which were spent in high school and the university and one spent at writing, and all three in studying immensely and intensely, I was publishing stories in magazines such as the "Atlantic Monthly," was correcting proofs of my first book (issued by Houghton, Mifflin Co.), was selling sociological articles to "Cosmopolitan" and "McClure's," had declined an associate editorship proffered me by telegraph from New York City, and was getting ready to marry.
Pott, permanently retired with the faithful bodyguard upon one moiety or half part of the annual income and profits arising from the editorship and sale of the Eatanswill GAZETTE.
If I fail as a writer, I shall have proved for the career of editorship. There's bread and butter and jam, at any rate."
It has been suggested that he might have accepted a magazine editorship, but this is doubtful, as he could not bear business details or routine work of any sort.
Instead, as quietly and matter-of-factly as she had filled her dead mother's place in the home while her brothers and sisters were growing up, Rose stepped into her father's business, took over the editorship and with a boy to do the typesetting and presswork, continued the paper without missing an issue.
Taylor, with Porphyry's Introduction, 9 vols., 1812; under editorship of J.
I think I could get the assistant editorship of the Levant Herald, but I am going to try to worry along without it.
Its politics were strongly liberal, and to oppose it the Tory 'Quarterly Review' was founded in 1808, under the editorship of the satirist William Gifford and with the cooperation of Sir Walter Scott, who withdrew for the purpose from his connection with the 'Edinburgh.' These reviews were followed by other high-class periodicals, such as 'Blackwood's Magazine,' and most of the group have maintained their importance to the present day.
Former executive editor of The Western Mail John Cosslett, who was night editor during Mr Gardiner's editorship, remembers him as an ``archetypal newspaperman''.
Terry Greenberg jumps from the editorship of the Truth in Elkhart, Indiana, to lead the newsroom at Bloomington, Illinois' Pantagraph, a 48,000-circulation, Pulitzer-owned paper whose Greek name means "write all things." "I wasn't looking.
Pam Brott of Virginia Tech as she assumes the editorship of Professional School Counseling.
Thomas Winship, 81, whose editorship of The Boston Globe from 1965 to 1984 was marked by the paper's winning of 12 Pulitzer Prizes, died Thursday at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.