editor

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ed·i·tor

 (ĕd′ĭ-tər)
n.
1. One who edits, especially as an occupation.
2. One who writes editorials.
3. A device for editing film, consisting basically of a splicer and viewer.
4. Computers A program used to edit text or data files.

[Late Latin ēditor, publisher, from Latin ēditus, past participle of ēdere, to publish; see edit.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

editor

(ˈɛdɪtə)
n
1. (Journalism & Publishing) a person who edits written material for publication
2. (Professions) a person in overall charge of the editing and often the policy of a newspaper or periodical
3. (Journalism & Publishing) a person in charge of one section of a newspaper or periodical: the sports editor.
4. (Film) films
a. a person who makes a selection and arrangement of individual shots in order to construct the flowing sequence of images for a film
b. a device for editing film, including a viewer and a splicer
5. (Broadcasting) television radio a person in overall control of a programme that consists of various items, such as a news or magazine style programme
6. (Computer Science) a computer program that facilitates the deletion or insertion of data within information already stored in a computer
[C17: from Late Latin: producer, exhibitor, from ēdere to give out, publish, from ē- out + dāre to give]
ˈeditorˌship n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ed•i•tor

(ˈɛd ɪ tər)

n.
1. a person responsible for the editorial part of a publishing firm or a publication.
2. the supervisor of a department of a newspaper, magazine, etc.: the sports editor.
3. a person who edits material for publication, films, etc.
4. a device for editing film or magnetic tape.
[1640–50; < Medieval Latin, Late Latin: publisher]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.editor - a person responsible for the editorial aspects of publicationeditor - a person responsible for the editorial aspects of publication; the person who determines the final content of a text (especially of a newspaper or magazine)
anthologist - an editor who makes selections for an anthology
art editor - an editor who is responsible for illustrations and layouts in printed matter
copy editor, copyreader, text editor - an editor who prepares text for publication
subeditor - an assistant editor
bowdleriser, bowdlerizer, expurgator - a person who edits a text by removing obscene or offensive words or passages; "Thomas Bowdler was a famous expurgator"
managing editor - the editor in charge of all editorial activities of a newspaper or magazine
newspaper editor - the editor of a newspaper
redact, redactor, reviser, rewrite man, rewriter - someone who puts text into appropriate form for publication
skilled worker, skilled workman, trained worker - a worker who has acquired special skills
2.editor - (computer science) a program designed to perform such editorial functions as rearrangement or modification or deletion of data
computer science, computing - the branch of engineering science that studies (with the aid of computers) computable processes and structures
application program, applications programme, application - a program that gives a computer instructions that provide the user with tools to accomplish a task; "he has tried several different word processing applications"
linkage editor - an editor program that creates one module from several by resolving cross-references among the modules
text editor - (computer science) an application that can be used to create and view and edit text files
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

editor

noun compiler, writer, journalist, reviser the editor of a women's magazine
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
مُحَرِّرمُحَرِّرمُحَقِّق ، مُحَرِّر
redaktorstřihačeditor
redaktør
editoritoimittaja
urednik
szerkesztő
ritstjóriritstjóri; útgáfustjóri
編集者
편집자
redaktor
urednik
redaktör
บรรณาธิการ
editöryayıncıyazı işleri müdürü
biên tập viên

editor

[ˈedɪtəʳ] N [of newspaper, magazine] → director(a) m/f; (= publisher's editor) → redactor(a) m/f (Cine, TV) → montador(a) m/f, editor(a) m/f (Rad) → editor(a) m/f
editor's notenota f de la redacción
the sports editorel/la redactor(a) de la sección de deportes
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

editor

[ˈɛdɪtər] n
(= journalist) → rédacteur/trice m/f
literary editor → rédacteur/trice m/f littéraire
economics editor → rédacteur/trice m/f en économie politique
(= director of newspaper) → rédacteur/trice m/f en chef
[anthology, edition] → éditeur/trice m/f; [text] → éditeur/trice m/f
(also film editor) → monteur/euse m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

editor

n (of text, newspaper, magazine, series, author)Herausgeber(in) m(f); (publisher’s) → (Verlags)lektor(in) m(f); (Film) → Cutter(in) m(f); (Comput) → Editor m; political editorpolitischer Redakteur m, → politische Redakteurin f; sports editorSportredakteur(in) m(f); editor in chiefHerausgeber(in) m(f); (of newspaper)Chefredakteur(in) m(f); the editors in our educational departmentdie Redaktion unserer Schulbuchabteilung; the editor of this passage obviously misunderstoodder, der diese Stelle redigierte, hat offensichtlich nicht richtig verstanden
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

editor

[ˈɛdɪtəʳ] n (of newspaper, magazine, managing director) → direttore/trice; (editorial director) → redattore/trice capo; (of section of newspaper, magazine) → redattore/trice; (publisher's editor, of series) → editore/trice; (of text) → redattore/trice; (of author's work) → curatore/trice; (film editor) → responsabile m/f del montaggio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

edit

(ˈedit) verb
to prepare (a book, manuscript, newspaper, programme, film etc) for publication, or for broadcasting etc, especially by correcting, altering, shortening etc.
edition (iˈdiʃn) noun
a number of copies of a book etc printed at a time, or the form in which they are produced. the third edition of the book; a paperback edition; the evening edition of the newspaper.
ˈeditor noun
1. a person who edits books etc. a dictionary editor.
2. a person who is in charge of (part of) a newspaper, journal etc. The editor of The Times; She has been appointed fashion editor.
ˌediˈtorial (-ˈtoː-) adjective
of or belonging to editors. editorial work/staff.
noun
the leading article in a newspaper.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

editor

مُحَرِّر redaktor redaktør Herausgeber επιμελητής έκδοσης director, editor toimittaja éditeur urednik redattore 編集者 편집자 redacteur redaktør edytor editor редактор redaktör บรรณาธิการ editör biên tập viên 编辑
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
At the end of three working years, two of which were spent in high school and the university and one spent at writing, and all three in studying immensely and intensely, I was publishing stories in magazines such as the "Atlantic Monthly," was correcting proofs of my first book (issued by Houghton, Mifflin Co.), was selling sociological articles to "Cosmopolitan" and "McClure's," had declined an associate editorship proffered me by telegraph from New York City, and was getting ready to marry.
Pott, permanently retired with the faithful bodyguard upon one moiety or half part of the annual income and profits arising from the editorship and sale of the Eatanswill GAZETTE.
If I fail as a writer, I shall have proved for the career of editorship. There's bread and butter and jam, at any rate."
It has been suggested that he might have accepted a magazine editorship, but this is doubtful, as he could not bear business details or routine work of any sort.
Instead, as quietly and matter-of-factly as she had filled her dead mother's place in the home while her brothers and sisters were growing up, Rose stepped into her father's business, took over the editorship and with a boy to do the typesetting and presswork, continued the paper without missing an issue.