educator


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Related to educator: Nurse educator, health educator

ed·u·ca·tor

 (ĕj′ə-kā′tər)
n.
1. One trained in teaching; a teacher.
2.
a. A specialist in the theory and practice of education.
b. An administrator of a school or an educational institution.

educator

(ˈɛdjʊˌkeɪtə)
n
1. (Professions) a person who educates; teacher
2. (Professions) a specialist in education; educationalist
3. (Professions) (in South Africa) a school teacher

ed•u•ca•tor

(ˈɛdʒ ʊˌkeɪ tər)

n.
1. a person who educates, as a teacher, principal, or educational administrator.
2. a specialist in educational theory and methods.
[1560–70; < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.educator - someone who educates young peopleeducator - someone who educates young people  
academic, faculty member, academician - an educator who works at a college or university
lecturer, lector, reader - a public lecturer at certain universities
head teacher, school principal, principal, head - the educator who has executive authority for a school; "she sent unruly pupils to see the principal"
professional, professional person - a person engaged in one of the learned professions
schoolmaster - any person (or institution) who acts as an educator
instructor, teacher - a person whose occupation is teaching

educator

noun teacher, professor, lecturer, don, coach, guide, fellow, trainer, tutor, instructor, mentor, schoolteacher, pedagogue, edifier, educationalist or educationist, schoolmaster or schoolmistress, master or mistress As a music educator, I taught in our city schools for many years.

educator

noun
One who educates:
Translations

educator

[ˈedjʊkeɪtəʳ] Neducador(a) m/f

educator

[ˈɛdʒʊkeɪtər] n
(= teacher) → professeur mf
(= educationalist) (mainly US)éducateur/trice m/f

educator

nPädagoge m, → Pädagogin f, → Erzieher(in) m(f); an educator of the youngein Erzieher m/eine Erzieherin der Jugend

educator

[ˈɛdjʊkeɪtəʳ] neducatore/trice, docente
References in classic literature ?
For Glinda gave her good advice on all occasions; and the Woggle-Bug, who was appointed to the important post of Public Educator, was quite helpful to Ozma when her royal duties grew perplexing.
By heaven, would not such an one be a rare educator?
The gentle force of attainder or confiscation or death which, as you are aware, these new Sophists and educators who are the public, apply when their words are powerless.
West, the well-known Brooklyn educator, was then in charge of the school, and remembers the lad's deftness in English composition, and his struggles with mathematics.
* A noted educator of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries of the Christian Era.
S-q- u-double e-r-s-Squeers, noun substantive, a educator of youth.
The men of the sea understand each other very well in their view of earthly things, for simplicity is a good counsellor and isolation not a bad educator. A turn of mind composed of innocence and scepticism is common to them all, with the addition of an unexpected insight into motives, as of disinterested lookers-on at a game.
The notion of rearing the Superman is only a new form of an ideal Nietzsche already had in his youth, that "THE OBJECT OF MANKIND SHOULD LIE IN ITS HIGHEST INDIVIDUALS" (or, as he writes in "Schopenhauer as Educator": "Mankind ought constantly to be striving to produce great men--this and nothing else is its duty.") But the ideals he most revered in those days are no longer held to be the highest types of men.
The public themselves, he says, are the real sophists and the most complete and thorough educators. No private education can hold out against the irresistible force of public opinion and the ordinary moral standards of society.
And there are no teachers in the higher sense of the word; that is to say, no real teachers who will arouse the spirit of enquiry in their pupils, and not merely instruct them in rhetoric or impart to them ready- made information for a fee of 'one' or of 'fifty drachms.' Plato is desirous of deepening the notion of education, and therefore he asserts the paradox that there are no educators. This paradox, though different in form, is not really different from the remark which is often made in modern times by those who would depreciate either the methods of education commonly employed, or the standard attained--that 'there is no true education among us.'
Garth, like more celebrated educators, had her favorite ancient paths, and in a general wreck of society would have tried to hold her "Lindley Murray" above the waves.)
This absence also brings me into contact with the best work being done in educational lines, and into contact with the best educators in the land.

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