effable

Related to effable: Krav Maga

effable

(ˈɛfəbəl)
adj
archaic capable of being expressed in words
[C17: from Old French, from Late Latin effābilis, from Latin effārī, from ex- out + fārī to speak]
References in periodicals archive ?
If, however, as I have attempted to argue here, the "groundless" elements of Jane's watercolors represent the quintessential elements from which specific portraitures--and in fact the verbal text itself--derive (as Wordsworth's poems derive ekphrastically from memory's gallery of forms), then word is handmaiden to the visual and functions to render effable the essentially ineffable.
Ever since the Aufbau - which itself emerged from a project begun before his association with the Circle and which, in his own estimation betrayed a merely superficial familiarity with Tractarian thought - Carnap sought to find ways of making logical form effable (a question the Aufbau had not asked).(20) He first thought he had reached this goal with his Godel-inspired Logical Syntax but following Tarski's work he turned to devising a succession of semantical systems, ultimately ending in the famous debate with Quine over, once more, the principle of logical tolerance.
Beets claims that "facts" and what we ordinarily take to be knowledge belong to the intuitive level, are effable, and can be transmitted by teaching.
At the level of language -- negation is effable, in the same sense as one can use a word form for pain or talk about it.
Indeed, both Heidegger and Jaspers subscribe to what they call tragic knowledge for insight into the limits of the knowable and the effable. In this essay, the author aims to engage their views of the tragic in critical dialogue in order to show that for both of these philosophers tragedy, in literature and in its philosophical interpretation, defines the relationships of thought to transcendence and of history to truth.
Language informs the classically heroic in no less a way than it tries to circumscribe vision, or make effable ineffable love.
That is to say, Jesus of Nazareth assessed his historical situation through human experiences, insights, and judgments of fact, and worked out the means of expressing the "ineffable" divine act of valuing and loving through "effable" human practical insights, judgments of value of the means, and decisions consequent on those judgments.
Harquail and King write that a member's experience of an organization has many features and forms that are ascertained through the member's embodied capacities, embodied experience has been relevant to how individuals understand their organizations, whereas psychodynamic processes and individuals' experience of them engage our effable and ineffable embodied modalities.
Baldwin's use of the word "tradition" in "Many Thousands Gone" was heavily invested in the identitarian connotations that the word accrued in the nine-teenth century When he lamented Richard Wright's inability, "to make this tradition articulate" he implied that tradition derives from the individual's ability to express a collective experience already grounded in the individual's psychology This is why Baldwin described an effable tradition as a "sensibility," an "experience" of the ancestral past integrated into the interior lives of individuals more seamlessly ("tough[er]" and more "profound") than they were integrated in Wright's novel.
Absent an analogy, it can only be that divine knowledge, Christ's ineffable knowledge, Christ's effable and supernatural knowledge, and Christ's effable and natural knowledge will merge into one big hazy fog." (73) Notice Lonergan's emphasis on the role of natural analogy in the systematic-theological task.
Unless the court can find an effable essence, its judgments tend to be ad hoc and unpredictable, qualities which in the school finance case will evoke nothing but criticism of the court and evasion by the legislatures.