effectible


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ef·fect

 (ĭ-fĕkt′)
n.
1. Something brought about by a cause or agent; a result.
2. The power to produce an outcome or achieve a result: The government's action had little effect on the trade imbalance.
3. Advantage; avail: used her words to great effect in influencing the jury.
4. The condition of being in full force or execution; operativeness: a new regulation that goes into effect tomorrow.
5.
a. Something that produces a specific impression or supports a general design or intention: The lighting effects emphasized the harsh atmosphere of the drama.
b. A particular impression: large windows that gave an effect of spaciousness.
c. Production of a desired impression: spent lavishly on dinner just for effect.
6. The basic or general meaning; import: He said he was greatly worried, or words to that effect.
7. effects Movable belongings; goods.
tr.v. ef·fect·ed, ef·fect·ing, ef·fects
To bring about; make happen; cause or accomplish: effect a cure for a disease; effect a change in policy. See Usage Note at affect1.
Idioms:
in effect
In essence; to all purposes: testimony that in effect contradicted her earlier statement.
to the effect that
With the general meaning that: He said something to the effect that he was sorry.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin effectus, from past participle of efficere, to accomplish : ex-, ex- + facere, to make; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

ef·fect′er n.
ef·fect′i·ble adj.
Synonyms: effect, consequence, result, outcome, upshot
These nouns denote an occurrence, situation, or condition that is produced by a cause or agent. Effect stresses the idea of influence or alteration: a drug whose main effect is to lower hypertension; increased erosion that was the effect of deforestation.
A consequence follows naturally or logically from its cause: a broken wrist that was the consequence of a fall; a reduction in crime that was the consequence of better policing.
A result is viewed as the end product of the operation of the cause: improved his grades as a result of better study habits; an experiment with an unexpected result.
An outcome more strongly implies finality and may suggest the resolution of a complex or lengthy process: The trial's outcome might have changed if the defendant had testified.
An upshot is a decisive result, often of the nature of a climax: "The upshot of the matter ... was that she showed both of them the door" (Robert Louis Stevenson).
References in periodicals archive ?
Fragmentation is mainly caused mechanically and the biological one is somewhat effectible due to increase energy gradient in the study area.
Some exploits, however, are sufficiently reliant on the abstract world of the game, the way in which its fictional world is constructed and coded, that they are effectible with a conventional control interface but allow complete revisions of the way in which the text is accessed and understood.