efficiency

(redirected from efficiencies)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to efficiencies: thesaurus

ef·fi·cien·cy

 (ĭ-fĭsh′ən-sē)
n. pl. ef·fi·cien·cies
1.
a. The quality or property of being efficient.
b. The degree to which this quality is exercised: The program was implemented with great efficiency and speed.
2.
a. The ratio of the effective or useful output to the total input in any system.
b. The ratio of the energy delivered by a machine to the energy supplied for its operation.
3. An efficiency apartment.

efficiency

(ɪˈfɪʃənsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. the quality or state of being efficient; competence; effectiveness
2. (General Physics) the ratio of the useful work done by a machine, engine, device, etc, to the energy supplied to it, often expressed as a percentage. See also thermal efficiency

ef•fi•cien•cy

(ɪˈfɪʃ ən si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. the state or quality of being efficient.
2. accomplishment of or ability to accomplish a job with a minimum expenditure of time and effort.
3. the ratio of the work done by a machine to the energy supplied to it, usu. expressed as a percentage.
[1585–95; < Latin]

Efficiency

 

cooking with gas Operating at maximum efficiency; performing well, functioning smoothly; really in the groove or on the right track. The expression probably comes from the efficiency of gas as a cooking medium (as contrasted with coal, wood, kerosene, electricity, etc.). Occasionally the phrase is jocularly updated by variants such as cooking with electricity or cooking with radar.

hit on all six To run smoothly; to function properly; to work to one’s fullest capacity; to be in physically fit and trim condition. This Americanism was originally used in speaking of internal combustion engines, specifically the functioning of the cylinders, which often misfired in earlier cars. When the figurative use gained currency, the word cylinder was dropped from the end of the expression. Variants include hit on all four and other multiples of two.

Modern science offers you a natural means to keep you “hitting on all six”—every minute of the day. (Saturday Evening Post, March 10, 1928)

in the groove In full swing, functioning smoothly, in top form. This U.S. slang expression was coined in the jazz age. Groove originally referred to the grooves of phonograph records. In the 1930s and ’40s, in the groove meant to play jazz music fervently and expertly, or to appreciate such music and by association be considered “hep” and sophisticated.

The jazz musicians gave no grandstand performances; they simply got a great burn from playing in the groove. (Fortune, August, 1933)

Eventually in the groove and groovy grew to mean ‘up-to-date’ or ‘fashionable,’ although this use is now being phased out of current slang. When in the groove is used, as in the following quotation from Webster’s Third, it emphasizes the quality of being in top form, rather than sophistication or fashionableness.

It made no difference, when he was in the groove, what he chose to talk about. (Henry Miller)

just like New York This American slang expression, usually an isolated comment on successful performance, has a wide range of equally vague equivalents such as right on, great, nice going, way to go. The reference is to New York City as the epitome of success, society, and fashion.

efficiency

The ratio of a machine’s energy output to energy input.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.efficiency - the ratio of the output to the input of any system
ratio - the relative magnitudes of two quantities (usually expressed as a quotient)
figure of merit - a numerical expression representing the efficiency of a given system, material, or procedure
2.efficiency - skillfulness in avoiding wasted time and effort; "she did the work with great efficiency"
skillfulness - the state of being cognitively skillful
economy - the efficient use of resources; "economy of effort"
inefficiency - unskillfulness resulting from a lack of efficiency

efficiency

efficiency

noun
1. The quality of being efficient:
2. The power or capacity to produce a desired result:
Translations
كَفاءَه، مَقْدِرَه، فاعِلِيَّه
акуратност
účinnost
effektivitet
djelotvornostefikasnostučinkovitost
dugnaîur, skilvirkni, nÿtni
zmogljivost
beceriklilikyeterlik

efficiency

[ɪˈfɪʃənsɪ] N
1. [of person, manager] → eficiencia f; [of method, remedy, product, army] → eficacia f
2. (Mech, Phys) [of machine] → rendimiento m

efficiency

[ɪˈfɪʃənsi]
n [person] → efficacité f; [method] → efficacité f; [institution] → bon fonctionnement m; [activity] → productivité f; [machine] → rendement m energy efficiency, fuel efficiency
modif [gains] → de rendement
efficiency savings → économies fpl de fonctionnementefficiency apartment n (US)studio m

efficiency

n (of person)Fähigkeit f, → Tüchtigkeit f; (of machine, factory, organization, system)Leistungsfähigkeit f; (of method)Wirksamkeit f; (of engine) (= power)Leistungsfähigkeit f; (= economy)Sparsamkeit f; (of service) → Effizienz f (geh); (of use) → Rationalität f; jobs were lost as part of an efficiency driveStellen wurden wegrationalisiert; software that improves the efficiency of translatorsSoftware, die die Leistungsfähigkeit von Übersetzern erhöht

efficiency

[ɪˈfɪʃnsɪ] n (see adj) → efficienza, efficacia, rendimento

efficient

(iˈfiʃənt) adjective
1. (of a person) capable; skilful. a very efficient secretary.
2. (of an action, tool etc) producing (quick and) satisfactory results. The new lawn mower is much more efficient than the old one.
efˈficiently adverb
efˈficiency noun

ef·fi·cien·cy

n. eficiencia, competencia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cost and Allocative efficiency: The cost and allocative efficiencies are estimated by solving the DEA problem of cost minimization
A data of 403 firms from World Bank Enterprise Survey 2013 is used for estimation of technical and scale efficiencies between and within exporting and non-exporting firms.
We appreciate the Legislature and Governor encouraging Vermont businesses to continue investing in ways that increase energy efficiencies, said Taylor.
The bias-corrected efficiencies are estimated in the first stage and are left truncated by 1.
Results obtained with RA in 2010 and 2011 showed that the hospital efficiencies of specialized hospitals, general hospitals, and TCM hospitals decreased successively, while in 2009, the efficiency value of TCM hospitals was the highest; meanwhile, within those 3 years, the average efficiency values of all three types of hospitals showed relatively great fluctuation.
It is classified into five efficiencies as technical efficiency change, technological change, pure efficiency change, scale efficiency change and total factor productivity change.
This includes increasing questions regarding claims of efficiencies in key sectors of the economy where concentration has substantially increased over time (e.g., airlines, food, media, distribution).
The optimal combination of the functional forms--the combination that produces the most skillful streamflow simulations--provides an indication for how evaporation and runoff efficiencies vary with each other in nature, a relationship that can be said to define the overall character of land surface hydrological processes, at least to the first order.
In most of the organizations considering the revenue to scale is not fixed and it is proper when all the agencies act in proper level but different issues such as the competitive effect, limitations, week efficiencies and others cause the agencies to not be able to act in a proper level.
General purpose electric motors (Subtype II) not previously covered by EPAct will be required to comply with energy efficiencies as defined by NEMA MG 1, Table 12-11.
Part load efficiencies are lower and vary on several parameters, such as supply and return chilled water temperatures, entering condenser water temperature, and condenser and chilled water flow rates.