eggs


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egg 1

 (ĕg)
n.
1.
a. A female gamete; an ovum. Also called egg cell.
b. The round or oval female reproductive body of various animals, including birds, reptiles, amphibians, fishes, and insects, consisting usually of an embryo surrounded by nutrient material and a protective covering.
c. The oval, thin-shelled reproductive body of a bird, especially that of a hen, used as food.
2. Something having the ovoid shape of an egg.
3. Slang A fellow; a person: He's a good egg.
tr.v. egged, egg·ing, eggs
1. To cover with beaten egg, as in cooking.
2. Slang To throw eggs at.
Idioms:
egg on (one's) face Informal
Embarrassment; humiliation: If you do that, you'll end up with egg on your face.
lay an egg Informal
To fail, especially in a public performance.
put/have all (one's) eggs in one basket Informal
To risk everything on a single venture.

[Middle English egge, bird's egg, from Old Norse egg; see awi- in Indo-European roots.]

egg′less adj.
egg′y adj.

egg 2

 (ĕg)
tr.v. egged, egg·ing, eggs
To encourage or incite to action. Used with on: The racing fans egged their favorites on.

[Middle English eggen, from Old Norse eggja; see ak- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eggs - oval reproductive body of a fowl (especially a hen) used as foodeggs - oval reproductive body of a fowl (especially a hen) used as food
food product, foodstuff - a substance that can be used or prepared for use as food
egg white, ovalbumin, albumen, white - the white part of an egg; the nutritive and protective gelatinous substance surrounding the yolk consisting mainly of albumin dissolved in water; "she separated the whites from the yolks of several eggs"
egg yolk, yolk - the yellow spherical part of an egg that is surrounded by the albumen
eggshell, shell - the exterior covering of a bird's egg
protein - any of a large group of nitrogenous organic compounds that are essential constituents of living cells; consist of polymers of amino acids; essential in the diet of animals for growth and for repair of tissues; can be obtained from meat and eggs and milk and legumes; "a diet high in protein"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
It buried its eggs two feet deep, depending on the heat of the sun for the hatching.
Peter Craig, to whose original story in this issue, "The Battle of the Partridge Eggs," we would call especial attention.
Listen to the story of Jemima Puddle-duck, who was annoyed because the farmer's wife would not let her hatch her own eggs.
As I reached their side a glance showed me that all but a very few eggs had hatched, the incubator being fairly alive with the hideous little devils.
That was because they rolled eggs at us," replied the King, with a shudder.
In the robin's nest there were Eggs and the robin's mate sat upon them keeping them warm with her feathery little breast and careful wings.
So he looked up, and said to the second son, 'At the top of this tree there is a chaffinch's nest; tell me how many eggs there are in it.
A DOG, used to eating eggs, saw an Oyster and, opening his mouth to its widest extent, swallowed it down with the utmost relish, supposing it to be an egg.
No, indeed; I never care to hatch eggs unless I've a nice snug nest, in some quiet place, with a baker's dozen of eggs under me.
So long as the bungalow is empty, we are king and queen of the garden; and remember that as soon as our eggs in the melon bed hatch (as they may tomorrow), our children will need room and quiet.
She had come to save him, to give him her nest, though there were eggs in it.
Out of the four nests which I saw, three contained twenty-two eggs each, and the fourth twenty-seven.