ego ideal


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ego ideal

n.
In psychoanalysis, the part of one's ego that contains an idealized self based on those people, especially parents and peers, one admires and wishes to emulate.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ego ideal

n
(Psychoanalysis) psychoanal an internal ideal of personal perfection that represents what one wants to be rather than what one ought to be and is derived from one's early relationship with one's parents. See also superego
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e′go ide`al


n.
Psychoanal. an ideal of personal excellence based on positive identification with parent figures.
[1920–25]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ego ideal - (psychoanalysis) the part of the ego that contains an ideal of personal excellence toward which a person strives
depth psychology, psychoanalysis, analysis - a set of techniques for exploring underlying motives and a method of treating various mental disorders; based on the theories of Sigmund Freud; "his physician recommended psychoanalysis"
ideal - the idea of something that is perfect; something that one hopes to attain
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Through this subversive Cartesian thought experiment Dr Hoffman seems also to probe the possibility of transcending the barrier of ego ideal excluding any form of alienation in the discursive self, whether historically produced or psychically conceived, in so far as it represents a threat to the image of seamless unity of the pre-discursive self.
Surely that explains his strange comment about how Andrew Jackson (his ego ideal) could have prevented the Civil War.
Psychic ties of commitment, perceived as feelings of 'loyalty,' are key here, and this works because organizations provide what he terms 'an organization ideal,' a phenomenon that essentially represents an ego ideal for people in the organization.
Content is organized around identity formation, the development of an ego ideal, and character formation.
Esse sofrimento, advindo de um estado descrito como "limite", encontra sua consistencia teorica no campo da psicanalise no conflito entre o imaginario e sua projecao de laco com o outro, isto e, entre o ego ideal e o narcisismo.
Lacan specifies that there are two fantasies or versions of an ideal self that can exist only in the imaginary: the ideal ego and the ego ideal. The ideal ego is the idealised self-image of the subject, the way in which the subject projects itself onto objects (my ideal self as I imagine it), while the ego ideal is an introjection that is associated with the symbolic, "the big Other who watches over me and propels me to give my best, the ideal I try to follow and actualize" (Zizek, 2006, page 80).
(6) Subjects constituted as "shameful" or "disgusting" perceive the source of their affect to have been generated from their own egos, which have failed to live up to the ego ideal; an idea which they then subsume into their own subjectivity.
One virtue of this chapter is that it clearly exemplifies the framework Penney has laid out in Chapter One, so that the reader can appreciate the analytic power that comes from distinguishing between the ego ideal and the imaginary version of objet a in the defiles of desire.
Ahad argues that Birdie initially identifies with Cole as her "mirror image" or "ego ideal," the "image that promises her racial unity and fulfills Birdie's void or 'lack' due to [Birdie's own] white complexion" (146).
In "the modern bourgeois nuclear family," Zizek tells us, the two basic Freudian functions of the father "are united in the same person." And the historical consequence is that, regarding the father's function in postmodernism, from this conflation in particular there arises the crisis of oedipal authority, precisely from the fact that "symbolic authority" today is radically "smeared by the mark of obscenity." Indeed, this fearful symmetry between "ferocious superego" and "pacifying Ego Ideal" is a hidden "truth of the Oedipus complex" (313).
The imaginary subject of the mirror stage is likewise framed in the symbolic by means of the unary trait, the ego ideal that identifies the form in the mirror, the ideal ego, as a subject for the Other; the proper name as the trace or metonym of the subject is 'a model for the unary trait' that constitutes 'a subject-as-meaning, despite the fact the name itself is meaningless' (55).