ego ideal


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ego ideal

n.
In psychoanalysis, the part of one's ego that contains an idealized self based on those people, especially parents and peers, one admires and wishes to emulate.

ego ideal

n
(Psychoanalysis) psychoanal an internal ideal of personal perfection that represents what one wants to be rather than what one ought to be and is derived from one's early relationship with one's parents. See also superego

e′go ide`al


n.
Psychoanal. an ideal of personal excellence based on positive identification with parent figures.
[1920–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ego ideal - (psychoanalysis) the part of the ego that contains an ideal of personal excellence toward which a person strives
depth psychology, psychoanalysis, analysis - a set of techniques for exploring underlying motives and a method of treating various mental disorders; based on the theories of Sigmund Freud; "his physician recommended psychoanalysis"
ideal - the idea of something that is perfect; something that one hopes to attain
References in periodicals archive ?
Psychic ties of commitment, perceived as feelings of 'loyalty,' are key here, and this works because organizations provide what he terms 'an organization ideal,' a phenomenon that essentially represents an ego ideal for people in the organization.
Content is organized around identity formation, the development of an ego ideal, and character formation.
The ideal ego is the idealised self-image of the subject, the way in which the subject projects itself onto objects (my ideal self as I imagine it), while the ego ideal is an introjection that is associated with the symbolic, "the big Other who watches over me and propels me to give my best, the ideal I try to follow and actualize" (Zizek, 2006, page 80).
Instead of becoming isolated by their shame, this opportunity for visual contact with themselves helps heal the rupttire between their ego and ego ideal.
Laying out the dynamic relationship among the ideal ego, ego ideal, and objet a, Penney convincingly argues for a shift from symptomatic to transferential interpretation in cultural studies.
For his part, Bill Cosey understands both that his father is not to be imitated as ego ideal, since there is something obscenely evil in this role, and, to the extent that it ever can be achieved deliberately, that he ought to construct a "self" in opposition to Dark.
The imaginary subject of the mirror stage is likewise framed in the symbolic by means of the unary trait, the ego ideal that identifies the form in the mirror, the ideal ego, as a subject for the Other; the proper name as the trace or metonym of the subject is 'a model for the unary trait' that constitutes 'a subject-as-meaning, despite the fact the name itself is meaningless' (55).
Freud discussed "a differentiation in the ego" as the ego ideal or superego, thus introducing the now familiar term but not as yet clearly distinguished from the ego ideal.
En general--et c'est le mensonge courant sur lequel se fonde cette litterature romanesque--, les heros trouvent cet alter ego ideal, avec lequel ils nouent une relation tout aussi ideale, qui, bien sur, n'entretient que des rapports lointains avec la vie quotidienne et notamment avec la realite du mariage.
The personality traits contributing to openness operate on the first level through the ego's navigation of (1) a realignment of the twin ideals of ego ideal (yearning for perfection) and ideal ego (inflated sense of self, and (2) successive deintegrations (Fordham) to accommodate newly consolidated growth.
Alford tries to weave a consistent model of whistleblowing that builds on the concepts of individuality and ego ideal to help us understand why whistleblowers feel like space-walkers who have been ostracized not just from the organization but also from everyone in society, including family and friends.
enabled him to integrate the derivatives of his powerful narcissism, his stifled and conflicted aggression, and his repressed but rebellious sexual and libidinal drives in a way that was consistent with his ego ideal and formed the basis for the articulation of his saintly and spiritual identity.