egoism

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e·go·ism

 (ē′gō-ĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The doctrine that human behavior is motivated by self-interest.
b. The belief that self-interest provides the proper basis for moral behavior.
2. Egotism; conceit. See Synonyms at conceit.

egoism

(ˈiːɡəʊˌɪzəm; ˈɛɡ-)
n
1. concern for one's own interests and welfare
2. (Philosophy) ethics the theory that the pursuit of one's own welfare is the highest good. Compare altruism
3. self-centredness; egotism

e•go•ism

(ˈi goʊˌɪz əm, ˈɛg oʊ-)

n.
1. the habit of valuing everything only in reference to one's personal interest (opposed to altruism).
2. egotism or conceit.
3. the view in ethics that morality ultimately rests on self-interest.
[1775–85; < French égoïsme]
e`go•is′tic, e′go•is′ti•cal, adj.
e`go•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.
syn: See egotism.

egoism

an extreme individualism; thought and behavior based upon the premise that one’s individual self is the highest product, if not the totality, of existence. Cf. individualism. — egoist, n. — egoistic, adj.
See also: Self
an extreme individualism; thought and behavior based upon the premise that one’s individual self is the highest product, if not the totality, of existence. Cf. individualism.egoist, n.egoistic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.egoism - (ethics) the theory that the pursuit of your own welfare in the basis of morality
theory - a belief that can guide behavior; "the architect has a theory that more is less"; "they killed him on the theory that dead men tell no tales"
moral philosophy, ethics - the philosophical study of moral values and rules
2.egoism - concern for your own interests and welfare
trait - a distinguishing feature of your personal nature
altruism, selflessness - the quality of unselfish concern for the welfare of others

egoism

noun
2. An exaggerated belief in one's own importance:
3. A regarding of oneself with undue favor:
Slang: ego trip.
Translations
أنانِيَّه
egoismeselvoptagethed
egoizam
egoizmus
sjálfselska, eigingirni
利己主義
egoism
bencillikegoizm

egoism

[ˈegəʊɪzəm] Negoísmo m

egoism

[ˈiːgəʊɪzəm ˈɛgəʊɪzəm] négoïsme m

egoism

nEgoismus m, → Selbstsucht f

egoism

[ˈɛgəʊɪzm] negoismo

ego

(ˈiːgəu) , (ˈegou) noun
1. personal pride. His criticism wounded my ego.
2. the part of a person that is conscious and thinks; the self.
egocentric (egəˈsentrik) , ((American) i:gou-) adjective
interested in oneself only.
ˈegoism (ˈe-) , ((American) i:-) noun
selfishness.
ˈegoist (ˈe-) , ((American) ˈi:-) noun
ˌegoˈistic, egoˈistical adjective

egoism

n. egoísmo.

egoism

n egoísmo
References in classic literature ?
But I always understood that those supermen were rather what you may call egoists.
She's an egoist," she said to herself, and stored that word up to give to Ralph one day when, as it would certainly fall out, they were discussing Miss Hilbery.
Well, anyway, I know that I am a blackguard, a scoundrel, an egoist, a sluggard.
A thorough egoist, a spendthrift and a miser in one,--that is to say, spending his money solely on himself,--sharp, aggressive, and indiscreet, he did mischief for mischief's sake; above all, he attacked the weak, respected nothing and believed in nothing, neither in France, nor in God, nor in art, nor in the Greeks, nor in the Turks, nor in the monarchy,-- insulting and disparaging everything that he could not comprehend.
The sight of Colleville, a man of real feeling, bound almost indissolubly to Thuillier, the model of an egoist, presented a difficult problem to the mind of an observer.
So true, so sweet, so noble, so little an egoist, and that, let me tell you, is much in this age, so sceptical and selfish.
Perhaps the rules of morality cannot be absolute," Benassis answered; "though this is a dangerous idea, for it leaves the egoist free to settle cases of conscience in his own favor.
Consider, in this connection, the so-called waiter rule, which points to a related matter of special interest to rational egoists.
There have been exceptions in history and some of the most prominent ethical philosophers, such as Socrates and Aristotle, can even be said to have been ethical egoists or at least ones who championed the moral virtue of prudence as central for living a good human life.
By various strategies it is alleged to fall outside the pale of ethically relevant theories, though what the defining conditions of admissible theories might be is often unmentioned or, if mentioned, indecisive or prejudicial; it is also sometimes thought to be inherently self-defeating or self-contradictory since the rational egoist cannot promote his doctrine among other men, though why he must or ought to do so or why the defensibility of egoism needs to be taken up only by egoists is ignored.
EU member states have become "the club of egoists," with everyone trying to protect themselves from their neighbors with a wall -- Germany has recently tightened its border control, similar measures were adopted in Denmark and the Czech Republic, the source said.
Once again, when they found that the ruling president will never budge or deviate from his main aim, they forced themselves to support him; and the braggarts, egoists and the vaunters are now crowing, bragging and boasting about the triumph of the 19th amendment - they now want to place their hand on the flagpole and say - " Aha