eiswein


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eiswein

(ˈaɪsˌvaɪn)
n
(Brewing) a German dessert wine made from grapes which freeze on the vine and are pressed before being given time to defrost
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ice wine was originally known as Eiswein, a German wine produced early in the 19th century, and 150 years later was popularized in Canada, currently the world's largest producer of such wine.
It's called eiswein in Austria and Germany, where it began; icewine, one word, in Canada, where it's become something of a signature wine; and ice wine, two words, in the United States, where vintners in New York state and few other regions are experimenting with the hard-to-make, easy-to-drink product.
Muskateller, Durkheimer Hochbenn Eiswein Weingut Kurt Darting Pfalz, Germany 1996
Be-fore dinner, there was some wine-tasting to be done in a cellar with accompanying mood music and light show as we sipped fruity rieslings and sweet eiswein.
Before dinner, there was some wine tasting to be done in a cellar, with accompanying mood music and light show as we sipped some fruity Rieslings and sweet Eiswein.
He also praised Post's Eiswein - that's "ice wine" in English - made from grapes that have been allowed to stay on the vine even until frost, concentrating the sugars and flavors.
Locally, Carruthers & Kent stock a super ice wine: Weingut Trk, Grner Veltliner, Eiswein 2009 (pounds 27.
Wines that are made from frozen grapes are called Eiswein (ICE-vyn), or ice wine.
They are labelled in order of sweetness from kabinett, sptlese, auslese, beerenauslese, eiswein to trockenbeerenauslese.
They also make Eiswein from grapes that freeze on the vines and are pressed when solid.
Why is German Eiswein such a much sought after and hugely expensive drink?
Ice wine originated in 1794 in Franconia, Germany where it is called Eiswein.