ejectment


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e·ject·ment

 (ĭ-jĕkt′mənt)
n.
1. The act or an instance of ejecting.
2. Law An action brought by one claiming the right to possess real property currently possessed by another.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ejectment

(ɪˈdʒɛktmənt)
n
1. (Law) property law (formerly) an action brought by a wrongfully dispossessed owner seeking to recover possession of his land
2. the act of ejecting or state of being ejected; dispossession
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•ject•ment

(ɪˈdʒɛkt mənt)

n.
1. a legal action to recover the title to real property.
2. the act of ejecting.
[1560–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

ejectment

noun
The act of ejecting or the state of being ejected:
Slang: boot, bounce.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

ejectment

nHinauswurf m; (Jur) → Herausgabeklage f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
In the meantime, if Mr Swiveller will take my seat, and try his hand at a fair copy of this ejectment, as I shall be out pretty well all the morning--'
Here was a fine prospect in the distance Not that the Surveyor brought the lesson home to himself, or admitted that he could be so utterly undone, either by continuance in office or ejectment. Yet my reflections were not the most comfortable.
Then, moreover, as regarded his unceremonious ejectment, the late Surveyor was not altogether ill-pleased to be recognised by the Whigs as an enemy; since his inactivity in political affairs -- his tendency to roam, at will, in that broad and quiet field where all mankind may meet, rather than confine himself to those narrow paths where brethren of the same household must diverge from one another -- had sometimes made it questionable with his brother Democrats whether he was a friend.
A: BRI's complaint for ejectment was prematurely filed.
In the investigation report, IO Sarfaraz mentioned that the police and local administration officials reached the area on Oct 24, 2018 to get the accommodations vacated after ejectment notices were issued by the state.
When Sacdalan failed to give updates on the case, Domingo said she inquired from the court only to find out that the lawyer has not filed any case for ejectment. Thus, Domingo said she was forced to hire another lawyer.
'The Revillas are literally killing the tahong industry in Bacoor by planning a massive ejectment of mussel farms and displacement of thousands of mussel growers to pave way for reclamation projects,' Candinato said.
Furthermore, commutation of rent from one form to another form; succession to occupancy rights; ejectment from tenancy; award of compensation; conversion of occupancy tenancies into absolute ownership and limit of personal holding as a result of enforcement of Punjab Tenancy (Amendment) Act, 1952 may be the potential areas of litigation between the land lord and the tenant.
The Birmingham Daily Gazette of July 21, 1921, carried a shocking report: "Corporal Elcock, Wolverhampton's only VC, is to be turned out of the home in Alma Street in which he was born and reared, for yesterday an ejectment order was obtained by the owner Edward Neachell, a dairyman, against the VC's mother, Mrs Fanny Elcock, on the ground that occupation of the house was required for the cultivation of the adjoining land.
The statute refers to this procedure as "ejection," which is not be confused with actions for ejectment under FLA.
reasons in an appeal concerning an ejectment action.
(115) Of the available remedies, the court explained that a "landowner 'may proceed by way of injunction to restrain the installation; or he may sue in ejectment; or he may avail himself of [section 523.090]; or he may maintain a common law action for damages.'" (116) If a suit for damages is chosen, the method for determining damages varies based on whether the trespass injury is temporary or permanent, as previously discussed.