ejector


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to ejector: air ejector

e·jec·tor

 (ĭ-jĕk′tər)
n.
1. One that ejects, especially a device in a gun that ejects the empty shell after each firing.
2. A device using a jet of water, air, or steam to withdraw a fluid or gas from a space.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ejector

(ɪˈdʒɛktə)
n
1. a person or thing that ejects
2. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) the mechanism in a firearm that ejects the empty cartridge or shell after firing
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•jec•tor

(ɪˈdʒɛk tər)

n.
1. a person or thing that ejects.
2. (in a firearm or gun) the mechanism that, after firing, throws out the empty cartridge or shell.
[1630–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ejector - a person who ousts or supplants someone else
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
2.ejector - a mechanism in a firearm that ejects the empty shell case after firing
gun - a weapon that discharges a missile at high velocity (especially from a metal tube or barrel)
mechanism - device consisting of a piece of machinery; has moving parts that perform some function
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ejector

[ɪˈdʒektəʳ]
A. N (Tech) → expulsor m
B. CPD ejector seat N (Aer) → asiento m eyectable
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ejector

n (on gun) → Auswerfer m, → Ejektor m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Now, here's a useful tool--.470, telescopic sight, double ejector, point-blank up to three-fifty.
"I thought so," said he, "the revolver had an ejector, and here is the third cartridge.
For much of the 20th century, the Military & Police Hand Ejector (a.k.a.
I spent a lot of time researching how much land or bearing length should be used in a core for various sizes of ejector pins.
The extra quarter inch of barrel, coupled with the deletion of the forward underlug/ejector rod pin/detent lock permits the use of a full-length ejector rod with only a 1/4" increase in barrel length over the old 2 1/2" barrel Model 66.
With the wide variety of manufacturers and parts, one annoyance I've always had is the unsightly gap around the 1911 ejector when viewed from the rear.
A: Smith & Wesson's first swing-out-cylinder revolver was the .32 Hand Ejector Model of 1896.
AN ejector seat manufacturer has admitted breaching health and safety laws after a Red Arrows pilot died when he was thrown 300ft into the air during pre-flight checks.
Such was the case when a competitive shooter alerted me of his urgent need for an ejector pin for his Model 70 Winchester rifle.
The aim of this work was to analyze an air ejector through computational fluid dynamics implemented in the Fluent package by Ansys[R] V 16.2.
In order to meet the future needs of C[O.sub.2] emissions reduction and energy conservation, DENSO has applied ejector technologies on varieties of HVAC&R products in both automotive and residential industries2,3,4 (shown in Figure 1).