electroencephalograph

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e·lec·tro·en·ceph·a·lo·graph

 (ĭ-lĕk′trō-ĕn-sĕf′ə-lə-grăf′)
n.
An instrument that measures electrical potentials on the scalp and generates a record of the electrical activity of the brain. Also called encephalograph.

e·lec′tro·en·ceph′a·lo·graph′ic adj.
e·lec′tro·en·ceph′a·log′ra·phy (-lŏg′rə-fē) n.

electroencephalograph

(ɪˌlɛktrəʊɛnˈsɛfələˌɡrɑːf; -ˌɡræf)
n
(Medicine) an instrument for recording the electrical activity of the brain, usually by means of electrodes placed on the scalp: used to diagnose tumours of the brain, to study brain waves, etc. Abbreviation: EEG See also brain wave
eˌlectroenˌcephaloˈgraphic adj
eˌlectroenˌcephaloˈgraphically adv
electroencephalography n

e•lec•tro•en•ceph•a•lo•graph

(ɪˌlɛk troʊ ɛnˈsɛf ə ləˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf)

n.
an instrument for measuring and recording the electric activity of the brain. Abbr.: EEG
[1935–40]
e•lec`tro•en•ceph`a•lo•graph′ic (-ˈgræf ɪk) adj.
e•lec`tro•en•ceph`a•log′ra•phy (-ˈlɒg rə fi) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.electroencephalograph - medical instrument that records electric currents generated by the brain
medical instrument - instrument used in the practice of medicine
Translations

electroencephalograph

[ɪˈlektrəʊɪnˈsefələgrɑːf] Nelectroencefalógrafo m

electroencephalograph

[ɪˈlɛktrəʊɛnˈsɛfələˌgræf] nelettroencefalografo
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract award notice: Comprehensive supply of related services of electroencephalographs, Electromyographs and evoked potentials to be allocated to the ou neurology of the po of garbagnate milanese.
Based on neurometric analysis of electroencephalographs (EEGs), the company's new breakthrough measurement tool enables more precise diagnosis of these developmental disorders.
Now, a team of researchers led by scientists at the University of Cambridge and the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, have used high-density electroencephalographs (EEG) and a branch of mathematics known as 'graph theory' to study networks of activity in the brains of 32 patients diagnosed as vegetative and minimally conscious and compare them to healthy adults.
The researchers, led by the neuroscientist Nicole Prause, hooked the subjects up to electroencephalographs and showed them pictures that ranged from romantic to sexually explicit.
The voltage values of output signals are selected in such a way that they may be used with all common bioamplifiers or electroencephalographs.