electrolyte

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Related to electrolyte disturbances: Electrolyte disorders

e·lec·tro·lyte

 (ĭ-lĕk′trə-līt′)
n.
1. A chemical compound that ionizes when dissolved or molten to produce an electrically conductive medium.
2. Physiology Any of various ions, such as sodium, potassium, or chloride, required by cells to regulate the electric charge and flow of water molecules across the cell membrane.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

electrolyte

(ɪˈlɛktrəʊˌlaɪt)
n
1. (General Physics) a solution or molten substance that conducts electricity
2. (Chemistry)
a. a chemical compound that dissociates in solution into ions
b. any of the ions themselves
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•lec•tro•lyte

(ɪˈlɛk trəˌlaɪt)

n.
1. any substance that dissociates into ions when melted or dissolved in a suitable medium and thus forms a conductor of electricity.
2. a conducting medium in which the flow of current is accompanied by the movement of ions.
[1825–35; electro- + Greek lyt(ós), v. adj. of lyein to loosen; compare -lytic]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·lec·tro·lyte

(ĭ-lĕk′trə-līt′)
1. A substance that when dissolved or melted becomes electrically conductive by breaking apart into ions. The movement of ions carries the current.
2. Any of these ions found in body fluids. Electrolytes are needed by cells to regulate the flow of water molecules across cell membranes.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

electrolyte

1. A substance which forms ions when molten or dissolved in a solvent and which carries an electric current during electrolysis.
2. A dissolved substance conducting, and decomposed by, an electric current.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.electrolyte - a solution that conducts electricityelectrolyte - a solution that conducts electricity; "the proper amount and distribution of electrolytes in the body is essential for health"
solution - a homogeneous mixture of two or more substances; frequently (but not necessarily) a liquid solution; "he used a solution of peroxide and water"
polyelectrolyte - an electrolyte of high molecular weight
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

electrolyte

[ɪˈlektrəʊˌlaɪt] Nelectrolito m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

electrolyte

[ɪˈlɛktrəlaɪt] nélectrolyte m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

electrolyte

nElektrolyt m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

electrolyte

[ɪˈlɛktrəʊˌlaɪt] nelettrolita m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

e·lec·tro·lyte

n. electrolito, ion que conduce una carga eléctrica;
___ balancebalance de concentración.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

electrolyte

adj electrolítico; n electrolito or electrólito
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is claimed that medications commonly used in intensive care units may contribute to the electrolyte disturbances as they can interfere with the absorption of electrolytes, alter hormonal responses affecting hemostasis and can directly affect the organ function as well.
Enemas may disturb your gut bacteria, cause electrolyte disturbances, harm bowel because of acidic products and cause rectal burns, inflammation and infections.A
(1) Generally, AGD occurs as a postoperative complication, but can also be seen in anorexia nervosa and bulimia, psychogenic polyphagia, trauma, electrolyte disturbances, and gastric volvulus.
It involves taking laxatives that cause diarrhea and occasionally dehydration and/ or electrolyte disturbances that can result in weakness, nausea, and confusion.
A comprehensive metabolic panel, complete blood count, and thyroid stimulating hormone test were unremarkable except for electrolyte disturbances, with a sodium level of 158 mEq/L and a potassium level of 2.6 mEq/L (reference ranges: 135145 mEq/L and 3.5-5 mEq/L, respectively).
Conservative management of brain injury involves prevention of secondary insult to brain which is usually of systemic origin, which in our study is respiratory complications followed by infection and electrolyte disturbances. The management of severe head trauma involves ventilatory assistance, prevention of posttraumatic seizures and the use of osmotic diuretics.
In rare cases where urethral catheterization is unsuccessful and patients are medically unfit for immediate surgical intervention, temporary urinary diversion is required to optimize renal function, acquire source control for infections and treat associated electrolyte disturbances. In this case, we report on the delayed presentation of PUV in a 9-week-old boy who presented with urosepsis, renal failure and bladder outlet obstruction.
Our study had limitations; firstly the sample size was small, secondly QTc is affected by a number of factors other than cirrhosis itself, such as electrolyte disturbances and certain drugs so the frequency of QTc prolongation may be even higher when cirrhotics with these compounding factors are included in the study, thirdly it did not assess prognosis in patients with QTc prolongation.
fur), obstruction of the GI (gastro-intenstinal) tract by foreign bodies, tumors, or strictures (narrowings), electrolyte disturbances, neuromuscular disease, and the side effects of various drugs can predispose to constipation in cats.
The most likely cause of these abnormalities was electrolyte disturbances [5].
As hyperglycemia-induced osmotic fluid and osmotic diuresis occur between compartments, electrolyte disturbances are expected resultant in patients with DKA.
This case highlights the fact that HG can cause profound metabolic and electrolyte disturbances in patients with the potential for resultant catastrophic consequences.

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