electromyograph


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to electromyograph: electromyography, electrooculogram

e·lec·tro·my·o·graph

 (ĭ-lĕk′trō-mī′ə-grăf′)
n.
An instrument used in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders that produces an audio or visual record of the electrical activity of a skeletal muscle by means of an electrode inserted into the muscle or placed on the skin.

e·lec′tro·my′o·graph′ic adj.
e·lec′tro·my′o·graph′i·cal·ly adv.
e·lec′tro·my·og′ra·phy (-mī-ŏg′rə-fē) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

electromyograph

(ɪˌlɛktrəʊˈmaɪəˌɡrɑːf)
n
an instrument for recording the electrical activity of muscles
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•lec•tro•my•o•graph

(ɪˌlɛk troʊˈmaɪ əˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf)

n.
a device for recording electric currents from an active muscle to produce an electromyogram. Abbr.: EMG
[1945–50]
e•lec`tro•my`o•graph′ic (-ˈgræf ɪk) adj.
e•lec`tro•my•og′ra•phy (-maɪˈɒg rə fi) n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.electromyograph - a medical instrument that records the electrical waves associated with the activity of skeletal muscles
medical instrument - instrument used in the practice of medicine
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, motor unite potentials of EDB, TA and EHL muscles could not be exited during voluntary muscle contraction whereas intense positive spines and fibrillation potentials on theese muscles during rest showed by needle electromyograph. As a result, according to the findings of this EMG, it was decided that acute axonal degeneration as markedly common peroneal nerve and lesser extent tibial nerve in the right distal extremity (Table 1).
After normalization of EMGs signal, the stage called Nihil followed, with the volunteer standing-up, with the 8 channels connected to the electromyograph, capturing the EMGs signal from the postural muscles, during 1 minute [12,13], with the volunteer in static position.
Our early EDX studies were with a NDI electromyograph (Neurodiagnostics Inc.; Santa Ana, CA, 92707; USA) using filter settings of 2 Hz (low) and 10,000 Hz (high).
Nerve conduction study was conducted on both arms (total: N = 220) at room temperature by using Nihon Cohden electromyograph (EMG) device.
All subjects underwent surface electromyography (sEMG) examination using the eight-channel BioEMG III BioPAK Measurement System Electromyograph (BioResearch, Inc., Milwaukee, WI, USA).
EMG produces electromyograms by detecting the electrical potentials created by muscle cells when they are electrically or neurologically activated using an electromyograph as shown in Figure 7.
Nerve conduction studies (NCS) and electromyography (EMG) were conducted using standard techniques (1), by a Neuropack Ml electromyograph (Nihon Kohden, Tokyo, Japan), with skin temperature maintained above 30 [degrees]C.
Surface EMG signals were captured using an 8-channel electromyograph (EMGSystem do Brasil Ltda., Sao Paulo, Brazil) with total gain of 1000, 110 dB common mode rejection, and 8 to 500 Hz, scanned to a computer via a 16-bit resolution A/D conversion card, and at the sampling rate of 1000 Hz.
Muscle activity was recorded in vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM) and rectus femoris (RF) by an electromyograph Miotool 800 with 2000 V/V gain and common mode rejection ratio > 110 dB, during two maximal voluntary isometric contractions performed in the Smith machine two minutes before and two minutes after each power test.
The electrodiagnostic assessment was done with a four-channel Oxford Synergy electromyograph (Medelec Oxford, UK).
Can triggered electromyograph thresholds predict safe thoracic pedicle screw placement?