electron pair

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electron pair

n.
1. Two electrons functioning or regarded as functioning in concert, especially two electrons that form a covalent bond between atoms.
2. The combination of an electron and a positron as produced by a high-energy photon.
References in periodicals archive ?
The year 2016 then, marks the 100th anniversary of Lewis's concept of the covalent bond model and electron pairs.
Detected electron pairs can bump into each other or into impurities in the solid, which dissipates energy and prevents the resistance-free flow seen in the superconducting state.
Accurate SEPs operating at high frequency and accuracy can be used to make electrons collide and form entangled electron pairs.
5) share electron pairs evenly and form nonpolar covalent bonds, such as carbon and hydrogen, whereas atoms with greater (0.
However, we demonstrate the term of the interaction between electrons and ions of lattice meditates the existence of the Frolich singlet electron pairs.
Nine studies consider such topics as the reactivity of unstable chemicals in the presence of transition metals, the comparative statistics of Cooper's electron pairs in low-temperature superconductors and in coupled holes pairs in high-temperature ceramics, vitamin E as an example of applying rare earth triflates as efficient catalysts in the fine chemicals industry, and the fractal physical chemistry of polymer solutions.
The proper voltage (about 2000 V) is obtained when the magnitude of the number of electron pairs is proportional to the x-ray energy of the incoming photon (just like a Si(Li) detector).
It is very likely that hydrazine binds between the copper centers of the binuclear complex through the lone electron pairs of the hydrazine nitrogen atoms.
7 Bonding Described by Electron Pairs and Molecular Orbitals.
We propose that the quantum magnetodynamic interaction between the magnetic fields of the orbiting anti-parallel electron pairs in the various atoms is the missing component in Gillespie's explanation and that this along with the electric force prevents collapse in solids.
When most of these materials warm to the point that they can no longer superconduct, the electron pairs split up, the electrons start to regain their previous energies, and the gap closes.
This limitation in movement could be present in other states of electron pairs, such as the Cooper pairs of superconductivity, mainly in high Tc Superconductivity, for example.

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