elegy


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elegy

a mournful or melancholy musical composition or poem written as a lament for one who is dead: The organist played a beautiful elegy at the memorial service.
Not to be confused with:
eulogy – an oral or written laudatory tribute; a set oration in honor of a deceased person; high praise or commendation: The minister gave a touching eulogy at the funeral.

el·e·gy

 (ĕl′ə-jē)
n. pl. el·e·gies
1. A poem composed in elegiac couplets.
2.
a. A poem or song composed especially as a lament for a deceased person.
b. Something resembling such a poem or song.
3. Music A composition that is melancholy or pensive in tone.

[French élégie, from Latin elegīa, from Greek elegeia, from pl. of elegeion, elegiac distich, from elegos, song, mournful song.]

elegy

(ˈɛlɪdʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a mournful or plaintive poem or song, esp a lament for the dead
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) poetry or a poem written in elegiac couplets or stanzas
[C16: via French and Latin from Greek elegeia, from elegos lament sung to flute accompaniment]
Usage: Avoid confusion with eulogy

el•e•gy

(ˈɛl ɪ dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. a mournful, melancholy, or plaintive poem, esp. a lament for the dead.
2. a poem written in elegiac meter.
3. a mournful musical composition.
[1505–15; (< Middle French) < Latin elegīa < Greek elegeía, adj. derivative of élegos a lament]

elegy

A serious reflective poem, especially one lamenting a death.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elegy - a mournful poem; a lament for the dead
poem, verse form - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines

elegy

noun lament, requiem, dirge, plaint (archaic), threnody, keen, funeral song, coronach (Scot. & Irish), funeral poem a moving elegy for a lost friend
Translations
رثاءقصيدَه رِثائِيّه
elegiklagesangsørgedigt
elegia
elegija
elégiagyászdal
harmljóî, tregaljóî
elegija
elēģija
elégia
elegi

elegy

[ˈelɪdʒɪ] Nelegía f

elegy

[ˈɛlɪdʒi] n (= poem) → élégie f
an elegy for sb → une élégie pour qn

elegy

nElegie f

elegy

[ˈɛlɪdʒɪ] nelegia

elegy

(ˈelidʒi) noun
a song or poem of mourning.
References in classic literature ?
We say, for instance, Gray's Elegy, or Shakespeare's Sonnets.
= slightly misquoted from Thomas Gray, "Elegy in a Country Churchyard" verse 13}
It is not my business here to write an elegy upon my wife, give a character of her particular virtues, and make my court to the sex by the flattery of a funeral sermon.
Synopsis: "In the Flesh: Embodied Identities in Roman Elegy" by Erika Zimmermann Damer (Associate Professor of Classics and of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Richmond) deeply engages postmodern and new materialist feminist thought in close readings of three significant poets (Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid) writing in the early years of Rome's Augustan Principate.
[USA], Apr 5 (ANI): American actor Amy Adams is all set to star in Netflix's adaptation of 'Hillbilly Elegy'.
Zimmermann places this motely crew, along with other non-idealized characters, at the center of elegy's political and intellectual project.
Vance's Hillbilly Elegy defined Appalachia for many, with Vance lionized as the region's latter-day prophet.
"Below Freezing: Elegy for the Melting Planet" by Donald Anderson (who is the Director of the Creative Writing Program at the US Air Force Academy) moves beyond misery and misunderstanding to take a literary approach to the debate.
(5) After pointing out the structural similarities to elegy in Satan's laments, Frey commented, "To a culture aware of the status of an exiled man, cut off from life's advantages and necessities, the story of Satan's fall must have been richly suggestive.
These experiences informed her Elegy Series, a collection of scanned enlargements of details from her paintings.
"Elegy" might be described as a memory play--not because it recalls the past but because it is a play that remembers.
Issues of social, religious, cultural, economic and political nature converge in this sensationalized story, and are skillfully tailored to fit a popular lyric genre in the Renaissance: the elegy.