elephant


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Related to elephant: Elephant man

el·e·phant

(ĕl′ə-fənt)
n.
1. Any of several very large herbivorous mammals of the family Elephantidae native to Africa, South Asia, and Southeast Asia, having thick, almost hairless skin, a long, flexible, prehensile trunk, upper incisors forming long curved tusks of ivory, and, in the African species, large fan-shaped ears.
2. Any of various extinct animals of the family Elephantidae.
Idiom:
elephant in the room
A matter or problem that is obvious or of great importance but that is not discussed openly.

[Middle English elefaunt, from Old French elefant, from Latin elephantus, from Greek elephās, elephant-, ivory, elephant, probably of Afro-Asiatic origin; akin to Tawllemet (Berber language of Mali) eləw and Mokilko (Chadic language of central Chad) 'êlbi, elephant, and possibly also to Egyptian 3bw, elephant, ivory, and Oromo arba, elephant.]

elephant

(ˈɛlɪfənt)
n, pl -phants or -phant
1. (Animals) either of the two proboscidean mammals of the family Elephantidae. The African elephant (Loxodonta africana) is the larger species, with large flapping ears and a less humped back than the Indian elephant (Elephas maximus), of S and SE Asia
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) chiefly Brit a size of writing paper, 23 by 28 inches
3. elephant in the room an obvious truth deliberately ignored by all parties in a situation
[C13: from Latin elephantus, from Greek elephas elephant, ivory, of uncertain origin]
ˈelephanˌtoid adj

el•e•phant

(ˈɛl ə fənt)

n., pl. -phants, (esp. collectively) -phant for 1.
1. either of two very large five-toed mammals of the family Elephantidae, characterized by a long prehensile trunk and large tusks esp. in the males, including Loxodonta africana of Africa, with large flapping ears, and Elephas maximus of India, with smaller ears.
[1250–1300; < Latin elephantus < Greek eléphās, s. elephant- ivory, elephant]

el·e·phant

(ĕl′ə-fənt)
1. A large mammal having thick, nearly hairless skin, a long flexible trunk, and long curved ivory tusks. There are two living species of elephants, the African and the Indian elephant. They can live over 60 years in the wild and display complex social behavior.
2. Any of various extinct animals, such as the mammoths, that are related to the living elephants.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elephant - five-toed pachydermelephant - five-toed pachyderm      
tusk - a long pointed tooth specialized for fighting or digging; especially in an elephant or walrus or hog
proboscis, trunk - a long flexible snout as of an elephant
pachyderm - any of various nonruminant hoofed mammals having very thick skin: elephant; rhinoceros; hippopotamus
proboscidean, proboscidian - massive herbivorous mammals having tusks and a long trunk
rogue elephant - a wild and vicious elephant separated from the herd
Elephas maximus, Indian elephant - Asian elephant having smaller ears and tusks primarily in the male
African elephant, Loxodonta africana - an elephant native to Africa having enormous flapping ears and ivory tusks
mammoth - any of numerous extinct elephants widely distributed in the Pleistocene; extremely large with hairy coats and long upcurved tusks
gomphothere - extinct elephants of Central American and South America; of the Miocene and Pleistocene
2.elephant - the symbol of the Republican Party; introduced in cartoons by Thomas Nast in 1874
allegory, emblem - a visible symbol representing an abstract idea

elephant

noun
Related words
adjective elephantine
male bull
female cow
young calf
Translations
فيلفِيل
слон
slon
elefant
elefanto
elevant
elefanttinorsu
slonslonica
elefánt
gajah
fíll
ゾウ
코끼리
elephantuselephas
dramblys
zilonis
słońsłonica
elefant
slon
slonslonica
elefant
ndovutembo
ช้าง
слон
con voi

elephant

[ˈelɪfənt] N (elephants or elephant (pl)) → elefante m
see also white C

elephant

[ˈɛlɪfənt] néléphant m

elephant

nElefant m ? pink1 ADJ a, white elephant

elephant

[ˈɛlɪfənt] nelefante/essa

elephant

(ˈelifənt) noun
a very large type of animal with very thick skin, a trunk and two tusks.

elephant

فِيل slon elefant Elefant ελέφαντας elefante elefantti éléphant slon elefante ゾウ 코끼리 olifant elefant słoń elefante слон elefant ช้าง fil con voi 大象
References in classic literature ?
Moffat, lumbering in like an elephant in silk and lace.
Now she places a gingerbread elephant against the window, but with so tremulous a touch that it tumbles upon the floor, with the dismemberment of three legs and its trunk; it has ceased to be an elephant, and has become a few bits of musty gingerbread.
The long rows of teeth on the bulwarks glistened in the moonlight; and like the white ivory tusks of some huge elephant, vast curving icicles depended from the bows.
The men would tie up their feet in newspapers and old sacks, and these would be soaked in blood and frozen, and then soaked again, and so on, until by nighttime a man would be walking on great lumps the size of the feet of an elephant.
The Hindus dreamed that the earth rested on an elephant, and the elephant on a tortoise, and the tortoise on a serpent; and though it may be an unimportant coincidence, it will not be out of place here to state, that a fossil tortoise has lately been discovered in Asia large enough to support an elephant.
You know how the keeper and the public regard the elephant in the menagerie: well, that is the idea.
Evidently Darley wa not a man--he must be some other kind of animal--possibly a dog, maybe an elephant.
Smaller boys than himself flocked at his heels, as proud to be seen with him, and tolerated by him, as if he had been the drummer at the head of a procession or the elephant leading a menagerie into town.
He went to India with his capital, and there, according to a wild legend in our family, he was once seen riding on an elephant, in company with a Baboon; but I think it must have been a Baboo - or a Begum.
As to forming any plan for the future, I could as soon have formed an elephant.
He seemed big as an elephant in the mist and twilight.
About them frisking playd All Beasts of th' Earth, since wilde, and of all chase In Wood or Wilderness, Forrest or Den; Sporting the Lion rampd, and in his paw Dandl'd the Kid; Bears, Tygers, Ounces, Pards Gambold before them, th' unwieldy Elephant To make them mirth us'd all his might, & wreathd His Lithe Proboscis; close the Serpent sly Insinuating, wove with Gordian twine His breaded train, and of his fatal guile Gave proof unheeded; others on the grass Coucht, and now fild with pasture gazing sat, Or Bedward ruminating: for the Sun Declin'd was hasting now with prone carreer To th' Ocean Iles, and in th' ascending Scale Of Heav'n the Starrs that usher Evening rose: When SATAN still in gaze, as first he stood, Scarce thus at length faild speech recoverd sad.