elephantine

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El·e·phan·ti·ne

 (ĕl′ə-făn-tī′nē)
An island of southeast Egypt in the Nile River below the First Cataract near Aswan. In ancient times it was a military post guarding the southern frontier of Egypt. A series of Jewish papyrus documents dating from the 5th century bc were discovered at Elephantine in the early 1900s.

el·e·phan·tine

 (ĕl′ə-făn′tēn′, -tīn′, ĕl′ə-fən-)
adj.
1. Of or relating to an elephant.
2. Enormous in size or strength: "the proliferation of superstores, superstadiums, [and] elephantine convention centers" (Herbert Muschamp).
3. Ponderously clumsy.

elephantine

(ˌɛlɪˈfæntaɪn)
adj
1. (Zoology) denoting, relating to, or characteristic of an elephant or elephants
2. huge, clumsy, or ponderous

el•e•phan•tine

(ˌɛl əˈfæn tin, -taɪn, -tɪn, ˈɛl ə fənˌtin, -ˌtaɪn)

adj.
1. pertaining to or resembling an elephant.
2. of massive size; huge: elephantine buildings.
3. ponderous; clumsy.
[1620–30; < Latin < Greek]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.elephantine - of great mass; huge and bulky; "a jumbo jet"; "jumbo shrimp"
big, large - above average in size or number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a large city"; "set out for the big city"; "a large sum"; "a big (or large) barn"; "a large family"; "big businesses"; "a big expenditure"; "a large number of newspapers"; "a big group of scientists"; "large areas of the world"

elephantine

adjective massive, great, huge, heavy, giant, enormous, immense, lumbering, gigantic, monstrous, mammoth, bulky, colossal, weighty, hulking, laborious, ponderous, gargantuan, humongous or humungous (U.S. slang) His legs were elephantine, his body obese.

elephantine

adjective
Translations

elephantine

[ˌelɪˈfæntaɪn] ADJ (fig) → elefantino

elephantine

adj (= heavy, clumsy)schwerfällig, wie ein Elefant; (= large)riesig, elefantös (hum); elephantine memoryElefantengedächtnis nt (inf)

elephantine

[ˌɛlɪˈfæntaɪn] adj (fig) → mastodontico/a, elefantesco/a
References in classic literature ?
For that reason the blood tingled through his body, when Hurree, skipping elephantinely, shook hands again.