eleutherian


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eleutherian

(ˌɛljuːˈθɪərɪən)
adj
giving or protecting freedom
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
8:20b-21) Here we find the Greek word fthora, "corruption," "decay," which is clearly the opposite of "fullness," "immortality (7)." Note the contrast between ten eleutherian tes doxes ("the liberty of glory") and tes douleias tes fthoras ("the slavery to corruption").
There are complete series of double-entry ledgers and journals of the old DPC from its founding year, 1801, through its end, February 1902, among the old company's numerous accounting records comprising the collection Accession 500, Series I housed in the Hagley Museum and Library (formerly the Eleutherian Mills Historical Library).
Rolling along from Bannerman Town on the south end of the island, we learned about the island's history and freedom seekers who were tagged "the Eleutherian Adventurers," and Eleuthera's being home to Christopher Brown, an Olympic silver medalist.
David Lewis (Greenville, Del.: Eleutherian Mills-Hagley Foundation, 1965), 22.
(7) Figures compiled from annual reports in Seagram Collection, Accession 2173, Series II, box 37, Financial Statements, Hagley Museum and Library, Eleutherian Mills, Delaware.
To the northeast, there were institutions like Randolph County's Union Literary Institute (which began publishing its own periodical The Students' Repository in 1863) and Jefferson County's Eleutherian Institute (which generally had between fifteen and twenty black students among its small student body).
1, 1951) (copy found in I DUPONT-GENERAL MOTORS SCRAPBOOK 88, Eleutherian Mills Historical Library, Wilmington, Delaware).
Of particular interest to them, says Lytle, are some 19th century stained glass and the site of Eleutherian College, built in the 1850s as Indiana's first college open to all races.
This metaphor of |unmixed democracy' - like unmixed wine both intoxicating, moreish, and with unfortunate consequences - which has a variant in Plutarch, Pericles 7.6, |pouring out the unmixed wine of freedom (akraton eleutherian oinochoon)' which also applies to the consequences of Ephialtes' reforms, goes back to Plato, Republic 562 a-d, a notorious passage about the liberty characteristic of a democratic state.
John Stover combed collections of B & O papers at the B & O Museum in Baltimore, the Maryland Historical Society, the Eleutherian Mills Historical Library, and the Library of Congress.
David Lewis, Economic Change in the Civil War Era (Greenville, Del.: The Eleutherian Mills-Hagley Foundation, 1965); and the review essays by Harry Scheiber, "Economic Change in the Civil War Era: An Analysis of Recent Studies," Civil War History 11 (Dec.
All records pertaining to the Du Pont company used in this article are located at the Hagley Museum and Library (formerly the Eleutherian Mills Historical Library), Greenville, Del.; citations use the library's system of filing.