eliminative


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Related to eliminative: Eliminative materialism

e·lim·i·nate

 (ĭ-lĭm′ə-nāt′)
tr.v. e·lim·i·nat·ed, e·lim·i·nat·ing, e·lim·i·nates
1. To get rid of; remove: an effort to eliminate homelessness; eliminated his enemies.
2.
a. To leave out or omit from consideration; reject: For now, let's eliminate from the discussion the possibility of failure.
b. To remove from consideration by defeating, as in a contest.
3. Mathematics To remove (an unknown quantity) by combining equations.
4. Physiology To excrete (bodily wastes).

[Latin ēlīmināre, ēlīmināt-, to banish : ē-, ex-, ex- + līmen, līmin-, threshold.]

e·lim′i·na′tion n.
e·lim′i·na′tive, e·lim′i·na·to′ry (-nə-tôr′ē) adj.
e·lim′i·na′tor n.
Synonyms: eliminate, eradicate, extirpate
These verbs mean to nullify someone as a factor or cause an activity or condition to come to an end, especially by using drastic methods: eliminated all opposition; eradicate guerrilla activity; policies that attempt to extirpate drug abuse.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

eliminative

adjective
Of, relating to, or tending to eliminate:
References in periodicals archive ?
In short, then, Arthur does not offer an eliminative reduction of phenomena to perceptions; rather, monads are primitive forces, and bodies are constituted by derivative forces.
Endorsing the view was Bridge of Allan's civic leader, Provost Dunbar, who said in recent years there had been 'unwarranted but growing opinion that Bridge of Allan's waters were simply saline with some eliminative qualities'.
They cover embodied cognition and eliminative materialism; consciousness and freedom of will; mind, metaphysics, and will to power; consciousness, language, and metaphor; ethics and life; and Redlichkeit and embodied wisdom.
Al Hashemi said that the initiative was being taken in sync with the World Health Organisation goal of eliminative HCV by 2030.
Heidegger chooses to call this environment "a world," but, as I have demonstrated, this is only defined negatively in contrast to the environment occupied by the animal, which is formed by what Heidegger calls (following Von Uexkell) the expression of an eliminative character (Enthemmung) of openness particular to the animal's so-called complete absorption into its environment.
When they are caught up in scandals or when the employees complaint about the illegalities of the management, they allegedly face eliminative punishment instead of taking action against the accused.
Asenso explaining the natural pathophysiology of disease causation said every cell or tissue or organ or system in the human body during its normal biologic function generates human waste or toxic biologic waste called filth and that it is the duty of the eliminative organs in the body to synergistically remove these toxins to maintain good health.
Firstly, it is precisely through self-consciousness that the eliminative conclusion about the substantial ego can be attained: after all, it is exactly when he most intimately enters what he refers to as "myself" that Hume comes to the conclusion of his merely stumbling on a few particular perceptions (12).
And although this might seem a less substantial revolution in thinking--Aristotle does not, after all, seek to eliminate the very category of innocent suffering--what is so eliminative about his interpretive model is that to the extent tragic characters are not morally at fault for their pains, neither are extrahuman forces or other human beings.
We both reject the view that consciousness itself does not exist, as espoused by eliminative materialists, who themselves verge on a well-earned extinction this point.
In order to justify this radical claim, known as Eliminative Materialism, Churchland puts forward an argument that takes three main steps.
Several studies connected the negative impact of BA on children physical development to nutritional features (eliminative diets at a food sensitization) and the pharmaceuticals used in the BA therapy [6,7].