elision

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e·li·sion

 (ĭ-lĭzh′ən)
n.
1.
a. Omission of a sound that would normally be pronounced in speaking a word.
b. The combination of two syllables into one for the purposes of poetic scansion.
2. The act or an instance of omission.

[Latin ēlīsiō, ēlīsiōn-, from ēlīsus, past participle of ēlīdere, to strike out; see elide.]

elision

(ɪˈlɪʒən)
n
1. (Phonetics & Phonology) the omission of a syllable or vowel at the beginning or end of a word, esp when a word ending with a vowel is next to one beginning with a vowel
2. any omission of a part or parts
[C16: from Latin ēlīsiō, from ēlīdere to elide]

e•li•sion

(ɪˈlɪʒ ən)

n.
1. the omission of a vowel, consonant, or syllable in pronunciation.
2. (in verse) the omission of a vowel at the end of one word when the next word begins with a vowel, as th'orient.
3. an act or instance of eliding or omitting something.
[1575–85; < Late Latin ēlīsiō, Latin: forcing out =ēlīd(ere); (see elide) + -tiō -tion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elision - omission of a sound between two words (usually a vowel and the end of one word or the beginning of the next)
deletion, omission - any process whereby sounds or words are left out of spoken words or phrases
2.elision - a deliberate act of omission; "with the exception of the children, everyone was told the news"
omission - neglecting to do something; leaving out or passing over something
Translations

elision

[ɪˈlɪʒən] Nelisión f

elision

nElision f

elision

[ɪˈlɪʒn] nelisione f
References in periodicals archive ?
He had a reputation for secret gift-giving, such as putting coins in the shoes of those who left them out for him, and thus became the model for Santa Claus, whose modern name comes from the Dutch Sinterkls, itself from a series of elisions and corruptions of the transliteration of 'Saint Nikolaos'.
The articles in this issue demonstrate variously how notions of sovereignty contain elisions and discrepancies.
I don't want a reader to growl: Adam is happy to acknowledge Lesbians, but then he's, also, happy to create his own set of elisions.
Remembering & Missing Edward Said "My argument is that history is made by men and women, just as it can also be unmade and rewritten, always with various silence and elisions, always with shapes imposed and disfigurements tolerated.
Indeed, Mandell's impeccable translation preserves the tone, rhythm, and pace of the French original as well as the unique voice of its protagonist and the 517 pages vital to its thematic structure (though each edition begins on a different page), without noticeable omissions or elisions.
Then he looks at temporal features in each composer: lyrical expansions, elisions, and rhythmic flow in Fanny Hensel nee Mendelssohn; repetition, motion, and reflection in Franz Schubert; doubling and reverberation in Robert Schumann; metric cycles and performative time in Johannes Brahms; and syncopation and the rhythms of speech in Hugo Wolf.
Although the reasons for these elisions are understandable, they rob the film of the bite that a more honest record might have had.
Elisions with [a] and e-muet present no problems, because they are flagged in the orthography:
You liked rusted weathered things which 'Had the sun, had the rain, had life and vitality,' which you cleverly juxtaposed--in fragmented elisions found form.
He suggests how previous critical interpretations--and in particular the false scholarly elisions that he identifies-have shaped the modern understanding of these fields.
As an implicit critique of the limits and elisions within any official story, many of these pieces manage to compel as much by what they leave out as by what they leave in.
The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Choir was as disciplined as ever but, unusually for them, their diction let them down with some lazy elisions of words, and others which were not clear at all.