elocution


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elocution

the art of public speaking, emphasizing gesture, vocal production, and delivery; public speaking style: His elocution was powerful and persuasive.
Not to be confused with:
eloquence – fluent and persuasive discourse: She speaks with such eloquence.
elucidation – clarification; making clear: Your method requires elucidation.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

el·o·cu·tion

 (ĕl′ə-kyo͞o′shən)
n.
1. The art of public speaking in which gesture, vocal production, and delivery are emphasized.
2. A style or manner of speaking, especially in public.

[Middle English elocucioun, from Latin ēlocūtiō, ēlocūtiōn-, from ēlocūtus, past participle of ēloquī, to speak out : ē-, ex-, ex- + loquī, to speak; see tolkw- in Indo-European roots.]

el′o·cu′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.
el′o·cu′tion·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

elocution

(ˌɛləˈkjuːʃən)
n
(Rhetoric) the art of public speaking, esp of voice production, delivery, and gesture
[C15: from Latin ēlocūtiō a speaking out, from ēloquī, from loquī to speak]
ˌeloˈcutionary, elocutory adj
ˌeloˈcutionist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

el•o•cu•tion

(ˌɛl əˈkyu ʃən)

n.
1. a style of speaking or reading aloud.
2. the study and practice of public speaking.
[1500–10; < Latin ēlocūtiō expression of an idea in words]
el`o•cu′tion•ar`y (-ʃəˌnɛr i) adj.
el`o•cu′tion•ist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

elocution

1. the art of public speaking.
2. the manner or quality of a person’s speech. — elocutionist, n.
See also: Speech
1. the art of public speaking.
2. the manner or quality of a person’s speech.
3. Rare. the act of speech.
4. Obsolete, eloquence.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elocution - an expert manner of speaking involving control of voice and gestureelocution - an expert manner of speaking involving control of voice and gesture
manner of speaking, delivery, speech - your characteristic style or manner of expressing yourself orally; "his manner of speaking was quite abrupt"; "her speech was barren of southernisms"; "I detected a slight accent in his speech"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

elocution

noun diction, speech, delivery, rhetoric, pronunciation, utterance, oratory, articulation, public speaking, intonation, modulation, enunciation, declamation, speechmaking, voice production He took courses in elocution and acting at the London Academy.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

elocution

noun
The art of public speaking:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
veltalenhed
beszédtechnika
framsagnarlist; framsögn
iškalbaoratorinis menas
daiļrunībarunas māksla
güzel konuşma sanatı

elocution

[ˌeləˈkjuːʃən] Nelocución f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

elocution

[ˌɛləˈkjuːʃən]
nélocution f, diction f
modif [lesson, class] → de diction; [teacher] → de diction
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

elocution

nSprechtechnik f; teacher of elocutionSprecherzieher(in) m(f); elocution lessonsSprechunterricht m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

elocution

[ˌɛləˈkjuːʃn] ndizione f, elocuzione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

elocution

(eləˈkjuːʃən) noun
the art of speaking clearly and effectively.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
A strange thing, that that part of an orator, which is but superficial, and rather the virtue of a player, should be placed so high, above those other noble parts, of invention, elocution, and the rest; nay, almost alone, as if it were all in all.
Prince Vasili himself, famed for his elocution, was to read it.
Wopsle's elocution - not for old associations' sake, I am afraid, but because it was very slow, very dreary, very up-hill and down-hill, and very unlike any way in which any man in any natural circumstances of life or death ever expressed himself about anything.
The distance also is so great that it needs a man with a fine voice and a knowledge of elocution to make himself heard in the choir; and according to long usage the Canons of Tercanbury are chosen for their learning rather than for any qualities which might be of use in a cathedral church.
Then it recited 'The Charge of the Light Brigade' and afterwards 'Excelsior.' You see, the chicken had eaten an Elocution Pill."
In that somewhat distant year 1875, when the telegraph and the Atlantic cable were the most wonderful things in the world, a tall young professor of elocution was desperately busy in a noisy machine-shop that stood in one of the narrow streets of Boston, not far from Scollay Square.
"Sire," said Bragelonne, with a voice soft and musical, and with the natural and easy elocution he inherited from his father, "sire, it is not from to-day that I belong to your majesty."
You may trust implicitly, my dear, in the elocution of an English clergyman!"
Malaprop's mistakes in language so seriously, and took such extraordinary pains with her blunders, that they sounded more like exercises in elocution than anything else.
For that which thou hast heard me speak to-night--was declaimed with the painful precision of a schoolgirl who has been taught to recite by some second-rate professor of elocution. When she leaned over the balcony and came to those wonderful lines-- Although I joy in thee,
Rushworth; but as a well-judging, steady young man, with better notions than his elocution would do justice to, he intended to value him very highly.
Sincerity is more important than elocution, isn't it?"