eloquence


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eloquence

fluent and persuasive discourse: She speaks with such eloquence.
Not to be confused with:
elocution – the art of public speaking, emphasizing gesture, vocal production, and delivery; public speaking style: His elocution was powerful and persuasive.
elucidation – clarification; making clear: Your method requires elucidation.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

el·o·quence

 (ĕl′ə-kwəns)
n.
1.
a. Persuasive, moving, or graceful discourse: "He has declined to believe Hermione's own honest eloquence" (Wendy Lesser).
b. The skill or power of using such discourse: a writer known for her eloquence.
2. The quality of persuasive, moving, or graceful expression: a passage of great eloquence.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

eloquence

(ˈɛləkwəns)
n
1. ease in using language to best effect
2. powerful and effective language
3. the quality of being persuasive or moving
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

el•o•quence

(ˈɛl ə kwəns)

n.
1. the ability to use language with fluency and aptness.
2. eloquent speech or writing.
[1350–1400; < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

eloquence

graceful, forceful, or persuasive speech. — eloquent, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Eloquence

 of lawyers: company of lawyers—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eloquence - powerful and effective language; "his eloquence attracted a large congregation"; "fluency in spoken and written English is essential"; "his oily smoothness concealed his guilt from the police"
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

eloquence

noun
1. fluency, effectiveness, oratory, expressiveness, persuasiveness, forcefulness, gracefulness, powerfulness the eloquence with which he delivered his message
2. expressiveness, significance, meaningfulness, pointedness the eloquence of his gestures
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

eloquence

noun
Vivid, effective, or persuasive communication in speech or artistic performance:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
فَصاحَه، بَلاغَه
красноречие
retoriktalegaverveltalenhed
beszédkészségékesszólás
málsnilld
facundia
gražbylystėiškalbingaiiškalbingasiškalbingumas
daiļrunība
språkferdighettalekunstveltalenhet
govorništvozgovornost
güzel konuşma

eloquence

[ˈeləkwəns] Nelocuencia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

eloquence

[ˈɛləkwəns] n [person] → éloquence f; [speech, statement] → éloquence f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

eloquence

n (of person)Redegewandtheit f; (of speech, words)Gewandtheit f; (of statement, tribute, plea)Wortgewandtheit f; (fig, of testimony, gesture, silence) → Beredtheit f; phrased with such eloquenceso gewandt ausgedrückt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

eloquence

[ˈɛləkwns] neloquenza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

eloquence

(ˈeləkwəns) noun
the power of expressing feelings or thoughts in words that impress or move other people. a speaker of great eloquence.
ˈeloquent adjective
an eloquent speaker/speech.
ˈeloquently adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
It's quite clear her heart is as insensible to eloquence and poetry, as a Potter's Field wall, and it might answer to try her with a little truth.
There was an odd sort of eloquence in his one arm, which had crept round her waist: but his lips were mute.
If I am vain of anything, it is of my eloquence. Consideration and esteem as surely follow command of language as admiration waits on beauty, and here I have opportunity enough for the exercise of my talent, as the chief of my time is spent in conversation.
Discretion of speech, is more than eloquence; and to speak agreeably to him, with whom we deal, is more than to speak in good words, or in good order.
In former times, when the same person was both demagogue and general, the democracies were changed into tyrannies; and indeed most of the ancient tyrannies arose from those states: a reason for which then subsisted, but not now; for at that time the demagogues were of the soldiery; for they were not then powerful by their eloquence; but, now the art of oratory is cultivated, the able speakers are at present the demagogues; but, as they are unqualified to act in a military capacity, they cannot impose themselves on the people as tyrants, if we except in one or two trifling instances.
Amongst other things they spoke of the middle ages: some praised that period as far more interesting, far more poetical than our own too sober present; indeed Councillor Knap defended this opinion so warmly, that the hostess declared immediately on his side, and both exerted themselves with unwearied eloquence. The Councillor boldly declared the time of King Hans to be the noblest and the most happy period.*
Honeythunder's--I think you called it eloquence, sir?' (somewhat slyly.)
And that this is the truth may be seen by the countless plays that a most fertile wit of these kingdoms has written, with so much brilliancy, so much grace and gaiety, such polished versification, such choice language, such profound reflections, and in a word, so rich in eloquence and elevation of style, that he has filled the world with his fame; and yet, in consequence of his desire to suit the taste of the actors, they have not all, as some of them have, come as near perfection as they ought.
I esteemed eloquence highly, and was in raptures with poesy; but I thought that both were gifts of nature rather than fruits of study.
Oh, mercy, how it stings!" The fixed gas in the lemonade took the orator, at that moment, by the throat, and effectually checked the flow of her eloquence. It made no difference to the girls.
Of limousine bodies, carburettors, spark-plugs, and inner tubes he spoke with freedom and eloquence, but the subject of love and marriage he avoided absolutely.
"The ship, or barque, or brig So-and-so, bound from such a port, with such and such cargo, for such another port, having left at such and such a date, last spoken at sea on such a day, and never having been heard of since, was posted to-day as missing." Such in its strictly official eloquence is the form of funeral orations on ships that, perhaps wearied with a long struggle, or in some unguarded moment that may come to the readiest of us, had let themselves be overwhelmed by a sudden blow from the enemy.