emancipation


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Related to emancipation: Emancipation Day

e·man·ci·pa·tion

 (ĭ-măn′sə-pā′shən)
n.
1. The act or an instance of emancipating.
2. The condition of being emancipated.

e·man′ci·pa′tion·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

emancipation

(ɪˌmænsɪˈpeɪʃən)
n
1. the act of freeing or state of being freed; liberation
2. informal freedom from inhibition and convention
eˌmanciˈpationist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•man•ci•pa•tion

(ɪˌmæn səˈpeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of emancipating.
2. the state or fact of being emancipated.
[1625–35; < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

emancipation

The abolition of slavery.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.emancipation - freeing someone from the control of anotheremancipation - freeing someone from the control of another; especially a parent's relinquishing authority and control over a minor child
freeing, liberation, release - the act of liberating someone or something
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

emancipation

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

emancipation

noun
The state of not being in confinement or servitude:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
تَحْرير، إعْتاق
frigivelsefrigørelse
emancipáció
frelsun
emancipácia
özgürlük verme

emancipation

[ɪˌmænsɪˈpeɪʃən] N [of women, slaves] → emancipación f (fig) → liberación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

emancipation

[ɪˌmænsɪˈpeɪʃən] n [women, minority group] → émancipation f; [slave] → affranchissement m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

emancipation

n (lit, fig)Emanzipation f; (of slave)Freilassung f; (of country, people)Befreiung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

emancipation

[ɪˌmænsɪˈpeɪʃn] nemancipazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

emancipate

(iˈmӕnsipeit) verb
to set free from slavery or other strict or unfair control.
eˌmanciˈpation noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Mainwaring will storm of course, but you easily pacify him; besides, the most scrupulous point of honour could not require you to wait for HIS emancipation. I have seen Sir James; he came to town for a few days last week, and called several times in Edward Street.
Living monuments shalt thou build to thy victory and emancipation.
I cannot remember having slept in a bed until after our family was declared free by the Emancipation Proclamation.
"No matter with what solemnities he may have been devoted upon the altar of slavery, the moment he touches the sacred soil of Britain, the altar and the God sink together in the dust, and he stands redeemed, regenerated, and disenthralled, by the irresistible genius of universal emancipation." CURRAN.[1]
"Excuse me," Sergey Ivanovitch interposed with a smile, "self-interest did not induce us to work for the emancipation of the serfs, but we did work for it."
Fortunate, most fortunate occurrence!--fortunate for the millions of his manacled brethren, yet pant- ing for deliverance from their awful thraldom!--for- tunate for the cause of negro emancipation, and of universal liberty!--fortunate for the land of his birth, which he has already done so much to save and bless!
What is important are the rights of man, emancipation from prejudices, and equality of citizenship, and all these ideas Napoleon has retained in full force."
You will write to me sometimes, my friends, and you will address your letters to Professor Westmacott, Emancipation College, Denver.
He wrote a pamphlet on Malt on returning to England (for he was an ambitious man, and always liked to be before the public), and took a strong part in the Negro Emancipation question.
Hence a great number of such as were professionally expressers of Beauty, as painters, poets, musicians, and actors, have been more than others wont to lead a life of pleasure and indulgence; all but the few who received the true nectar; and, as it was a spurious mode of attaining freedom, as it was an emancipation not into the heavens but into the freedom of baser places, they were punished for that advantage they won, by a dissipation and deterioration.
A feature of the feeling, however, is a deep sense of contentment; another feature of it is a buoyant, boyish gladness; and a third and very conspicuous feature of it is one's sense of the remoteness of the work-day world and his entire emancipation from it and its affairs.
United action, of the leading civilised countries at least, is one of the first conditions for the emancipation of the proletariat.