embalming


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Related to embalming: cremation

em·balm

 (ĕm-bäm′)
tr.v. em·balmed, em·balm·ing, em·balms
1. To treat (a corpse) with preservatives in order to prevent decay.
2. To protect from change or oblivion; preserve or fix: "A precedent embalms a principle" (Benjamin Disraeli).
3. To impart fragrance to; perfume: Spicy aromas embalmed the air.

[Middle English embaumen, from Old French embasmer : en-, in; see en-1 + basme, balm; see balm.]

em·balm′er n.
em·balm′ment n.

embalming

(ɪmˈbɑːmɪŋ)
n
the act or process of embalming (a dead body). See also embalming fluid
Translations

embalming

[ɪmˈbɑːmɪŋ]
A. Nembalsamamiento m
B. CPD embalming fluid Nlíquido m embalsamador

embalming

[ɪmˈbɑːmɪŋ] n [body, corpse] → embaumement m embalming fluidembalming fluid nfluide m d'embaumement

embalming

n. embalsamiento, preservación del cuerpo después de la muerte por medio de sustancias químicas.
References in classic literature ?
The brain it was customary to withdraw through the nose; the intestines through an incision in the side; the body was then shaved, washed, and salted; then laid aside for several weeks, when the operation of embalming, properly so called, began.
But the fact is, I fell into catalepsy, and it was considered by my best friends that I was either dead or should be; they accordingly embalmed me at once -- I presume you are aware of the chief principle of the embalming process?"
After the discovery of the embalming principle, as I have already described it to you, it occurred to our philosophers that a laudable curiosity might be gratified, and, at the same time, the interests of science much advanced, by living this natural term in installments.
I fancy I see my brave countrymen encamped at the bottom of some valley, on the borders of a Selenite stream, near a projectile half-buried by its fall amid volcanic rubbish, Captain Nicholl beginning his leveling operations, President Barbicane writing out his notes, and Michel Ardan embalming the lunar solitudes with the perfume of his "
The islanders understand the art of embalming, and practise it with such success that the bodies of their great chiefs are frequently preserved for many years in the very houses where they died.
By embalming their dead and thereby deranging the natural balance between animal and vegetable life, the Egyptians made their once fertile and populous country barren and incapable of supporting more than a meagre crew.
The doctors are embalming the corpse, and when it is ready it will be placed in a lighted chapel."
Oh, old age is coming, cold and inexorable; it envelops in its funereal crape all that was brilliant, all that was embalming in my youth; then it throws that sweet burthen on its shoulders and carries it away with the rest into the fathomless gulf of death."
Funeral home workers have traditionally shown higher rates of TB infection; researchers now suspect that infectious aerosols produced during embalming may be responsible.
But they've overlooked one potential argument against the practice: When we bury our loved ones, we're also burying a good deal of embalming fluid.
Kissed, Lynne Stopkewich's auspicious debut feature about a young woman who prefers her lovers naked and dead in the embalming room where she works, premiered at the 1996 Toronto International Film Festival.
In the words of Sister Francesca of Montefalco, testifying some years later at Chiara's unsuccessful canonization procedure, "They agreed that [her] body should be preserved on account of her holiness and because God took such pleasure in her body and her heart."(1) They sent to the town apothecary for "balsam and myrrh and other preservatives," as the apothecary himself testified,(2) and they proceeded to the next step in contemporary embalming practice, which was evisceration.