embark

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em·bark

 (ĕm-bärk′)
v. em·barked, em·bark·ing, em·barks
v.tr.
1. To cause to board a vessel or aircraft: stopped to embark passengers.
2. To enlist (a person or persons) or invest (capital) in an enterprise.
v.intr.
1. To go aboard a vessel or aircraft, as at the start of a journey.
2. To set out on a venture; commence: embark on a world tour.

[French embarquer, from Late Old French, probably from Medieval Latin imbarcāre : Latin in-, in- + barca, boat; see bark3.]

em′bar·ka′tion, em·bark′ment n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

embark

(ɛmˈbɑːk)
vb
1. to board (a ship or aircraft)
2. (intr; usually foll by on or upon) to commence or engage (in) a new project, venture, etc
[C16: via French from Old Provençal embarcar, from em- + barca boat, barque]
ˌembarˈkation, ˌembarˈcation n
emˈbarkment n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

em•bark

(ɛmˈbɑrk)
v.i.
1. to board a ship, aircraft, or other vehicle, as for a journey.
2. to start or partake in an enterprise: to embark on a business venture.
v.t.
3. to board (passengers) onto a ship, aircraft, or the like.
4. to start up or invest in an enterprise.
[1540–50; < Middle French embarquer < Sp embarcar]
em`bar•ka′tion, n.
em•bark′ment, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

embark


Past participle: embarked
Gerund: embarking

Imperative
embark
embark
Present
I embark
you embark
he/she/it embarks
we embark
you embark
they embark
Preterite
I embarked
you embarked
he/she/it embarked
we embarked
you embarked
they embarked
Present Continuous
I am embarking
you are embarking
he/she/it is embarking
we are embarking
you are embarking
they are embarking
Present Perfect
I have embarked
you have embarked
he/she/it has embarked
we have embarked
you have embarked
they have embarked
Past Continuous
I was embarking
you were embarking
he/she/it was embarking
we were embarking
you were embarking
they were embarking
Past Perfect
I had embarked
you had embarked
he/she/it had embarked
we had embarked
you had embarked
they had embarked
Future
I will embark
you will embark
he/she/it will embark
we will embark
you will embark
they will embark
Future Perfect
I will have embarked
you will have embarked
he/she/it will have embarked
we will have embarked
you will have embarked
they will have embarked
Future Continuous
I will be embarking
you will be embarking
he/she/it will be embarking
we will be embarking
you will be embarking
they will be embarking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been embarking
you have been embarking
he/she/it has been embarking
we have been embarking
you have been embarking
they have been embarking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been embarking
you will have been embarking
he/she/it will have been embarking
we will have been embarking
you will have been embarking
they will have been embarking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been embarking
you had been embarking
he/she/it had been embarking
we had been embarking
you had been embarking
they had been embarking
Conditional
I would embark
you would embark
he/she/it would embark
we would embark
you would embark
they would embark
Past Conditional
I would have embarked
you would have embarked
he/she/it would have embarked
we would have embarked
you would have embarked
they would have embarked
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.embark - go on board
board, get on - get on board of (trains, buses, ships, aircraft, etc.)
emplane, enplane - board a plane
debark, disembark, set down - go ashore; "The passengers disembarked at Southampton"
2.embark - set out on (an enterprise or subject of study); "she embarked upon a new career"
begin, commence, set out, start, start out, set about, get down, get - take the first step or steps in carrying out an action; "We began working at dawn"; "Who will start?"; "Get working as soon as the sun rises!"; "The first tourists began to arrive in Cambodia"; "He began early in the day"; "Let's get down to work now"
take up - pursue or resume; "take up a matter for consideration"
3.embark - proceed somewhere despite the risk of possible dangers; "We ventured into the world of high-tech and bought a supercomputer"
go, proceed, move - follow a procedure or take a course; "We should go farther in this matter"; "She went through a lot of trouble"; "go about the world in a certain manner"; "Messages must go through diplomatic channels"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

embark

verb go aboard, climb aboard, board ship, step aboard, go on board, take ship They embarked on the battle cruiser HMS Renown.
go aboard land, arrive, get off, alight, step out of, go ashore
embark on something begin, start, launch, enter, engage, take up, set out, undertake, initiate, set about, plunge into, commence, broach He is embarking on a new career as a writer.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

embark

verb
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يَرْكَبُ سَفينَةُ
gå ombord
behajóz
setja/fara um borî
leistissėdimas į laivąsėsti į laivąsodinimas į laivąsodinti į laivą
kāpt uz kuģakraut kuģī
nalodiť

embark

[ɪmˈbɑːk]
A. VTembarcar
B. VI (Naut, Aer) → embarcarse (for, on con rumbo a en) to embark on [+ journey] → emprender; [+ business venture, explanation, discussion] → lanzarse a, embarcarse en
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

embark

[ɪmˈbɑːrk]
vi (= board a ship) → embarquer, s'embarquer
to embark on [+ ship] → embarquer à bord de, s'embarquer à bord de, embarquer sur, s'embarquer sur
vt [+ ship] → embarquer
embark on
embark upon vt fus (= begin) [+ journey] → entreprendre; [+ course of action] → se lancer dans; [+ sth risky, dubious] → s'embarquer dans
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

embark

vteinschiffen; goods alsoverladen
vi
(Naut) → sich einschiffen; (troops)eingeschifft werden
(fig) to embark up(on) somethingetw anfangen, etw beginnen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

embark

[ɪmˈbɑːk] (Naut, Aer)
1. viimbarcarsi
2. vtimbarcare
embark on vi + prep (journey) → intraprendere; (business venture, explanation, discussion) → imbarcarsi in
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

embark

(imˈbaːk) verb
to go, or put, on board ship. Passengers should embark early.
ˌembarˈkation (em-) noun
embark on
to start or engage in. She embarked on a new career.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
They bore their confinement, and received their sentence with a fortitude and resignation altogether unexpected; but when the hour of embarkation arrived, in which they were to leave the land of their nativity forever--to part with their friends and relatives, without the hope of ever seeing them again, and to be dispersed among strangers, whose language, customs and religion were opposed to their own, the weakness of human nature prevailed, and they were overpowered with the sense of their miseries.
Several artisans were likewise to sail in the ship, for the supply of the colony; but the most peculiar and characteristic part of this motley embarkation consisted of thirteen Canadian "voyageurs,"who had enlisted for five years.
We had then made 1,600 miles since our embarkation in the seas of Japan.
By way of escort, he would accompany Cerre to the point of embarkation, and then make an autumnal hunt in the Crow country.
In the meanwhile, I was to seek out a lawyer, who was an Appin Stewart, and a man therefore to be wholly trusted; and it should be his part to find a ship and to arrange for Alan's safe embarkation. No sooner was this business done, than the words seemed to leave us; and though I would seek to jest with Alan under the name of Mr.
Those are as fixed as fate, and my voyage is only now delayed until the weather shall permit my embarkation. The winter has been dreadfully severe, but the spring promises well, and it is considered as a remarkably early season, so that perhaps I may sail sooner than I expected.
The usual place of embarkation was half a mile from the house, but I had an intimate conviction that, wherever Flora might be, she was not near home.
I recognized the face of my friend Gordon Doyle, whom I had met in Liverpool on the day of my embarkation, when he was himself about to sail on the steamer City of Prague, on which he had urged me to accompany him.
"Senor," replied the youth, "in this bundle I carry velvet pantaloons to match this jacket; if I wear them out on the road, I shall not be able to make a decent appearance in them in the city, and I have not the wherewithal to buy others; and so for this reason, as well as to keep myself cool, I am making my way in this fashion to overtake some companies of infantry that are not twelve leagues off, in which I shall enlist, and there will be no want of baggage trains to travel with after that to the place of embarkation, which they say will be Carthagena; I would rather have the King for a master, and serve him in the wars, than serve a court pauper."