embranchment

em·branch·ment

 (ĕm-brănch′mənt)
n.
1. A branching out, as of a mountain range or river.
2. A branch or ramification.

embranchment

(ɪmˈbrɑːntʃmənt)
n
1. (Physical Geography) the process of branching out, esp by a river
2. (Physical Geography) a branching out or ramification, as of a river or mountain range

em•branch•ment

(ɛmˈbræntʃ mənt, -ˈbrɑntʃ-)

n.
1. a branching off.
2. a branch.
[1820–30; < French embranchement]
References in periodicals archive ?
Both NJ and MP trees demonstrated that gayals were markedly divided into three embranchments: one embranchment clustering with Bos gaurus, another clustering with Bos taurus, and the third clustering with Bos indicus.
It is continuous, directional, and without embranchment, connecting base points.
We must comment now on the next major embranchment, Scleroglossa, then parted into two natural lineages: Gekkota and Autarchoglossa.
That is our last information about Lacertoidea of the Scincomorpha embranchment. The striking morphological affinities in supraocular lepidosis between Lacertidae and their counterpart Teiioidea from the American continent sound suggestive.
Both NJ and MP trees demonstrated that gayals in this study were markedly divided into three embranchments: one embranchment clustering with Bos gaurus, another clustering with Bos taurus, and the third clustering with Bos indicus.
Our data of phylogenetic analysis indicated that the first embranchment of gayals was closely allied with the gaur (Bos gaurus) (Figures 2 and 3).
The main reasons for noise in the subway are: Road intersects (embranchments switches), turning on rail, electric motors, electric equipment, signals, locomotives, stopping and also aerodynamic noise.[2]
These interconnected communication channels constitute electronic networks of connection, which do not compose any structure, but constitute the complexes of technological embranchments, extending to the modern cities as well as to the remote villages.
The impressions from Negroes betray the general clumsiness of their fingers, but their patterns are not, so far as I can find, different from those of others, they are not simpler as judged either by their contours or by the number of origins, embranchments, islands, and enclosures contained in them....
As we have seen, he speaks of some skin lines as "islands," others he calls "ridges" or "embranchments"--a rhetorical strategy that is perfectly consistent with Ellis's elaborate "mapping" of the criminal body.
Finally, it moves toward exteriors through secondary embranchments of main streams for irrigating different parts of the garden.
They begin to grow in the spring and produce lots of embranchments and then the flowers appear.