mortality

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mor·tal·i·ty

 (môr-tăl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. mor·tal·i·ties
1. The quality or condition of being mortal.
2. Mortals considered as a group; the human race.
3. Death, especially of large numbers; heavy loss of life: the mortality wrought by an epidemic.
4. Death rate.
5. The rate of failure or loss: the high mortality among family-run farms.

mortality

(mɔːˈtælɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the condition of being mortal
2. (Pathology) great loss of life, as in war or disaster
3. (Pathology) the number of deaths in a given period
4. mankind; humanity
5. an obsolete word for death

mor•tal•i•ty

(mɔrˈtæl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the state or condition of being subject to death.
2. the relative frequency of deaths in a specific population; death rate.
3. mortal beings collectively; humanity.
4. death or destruction on a large scale, as from war, plague, or famine.
5. Obs. death.
[1300–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mortality - the quality or state of being mortalmortality - the quality or state of being mortal
impermanence, impermanency - the property of not existing for indefinitely long durations
immortality - the quality or state of being immortal
2.mortality - the ratio of deaths in an area to the population of that area; expressed per 1000 per year
infant deathrate, infant mortality, infant mortality rate - the death rate during the first year of life
neonatal mortality, neonatal mortality rate - the death rate during the first 28 days of life
rate - a magnitude or frequency relative to a time unit; "they traveled at a rate of 55 miles per hour"; "the rate of change was faster than expected"

mortality

noun
1. humanity, transience, impermanence, ephemerality, temporality, corporeality, impermanency The event served as a stark reminder of our mortality.
2. death, dying, fatality, loss of life the nation's infant mortality rate
Quotations
"Dust thou art, and unto dust thou shalt return" Bible: Genesis
"Earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust" Book of Common Prayer
"Old mortality, the ruins of forgotten times" [Thomas Browne Hydriotaphia]
"All men think all men mortal but themselves" [Edward Young Night Thoughts]
"Man that is born of a woman is of few days, and full of trouble. He cometh forth like a flower, and is cut down; he fleeth also as a shadow, and continueth not" Bible: Job
Proverbs
"Here today and gone tomorrow"
Translations
عَدَد الوَفياتفَناء، وفاة
smrtelnostúmrtnost
=-dødeligheddødelighed
smrtnost
halálozáshalálozási arányhalandóság
dánartíînidauîleiki
smrteľnosť
dödlighet
ölüm oranıölümlülük

mortality

[mɔːˈtælɪtɪ]
A. N
1. (= condition) → mortalidad f
2. (= fatalities) → mortandad f, número m de víctimas
B. CPD mortality rate Ntasa f de mortalidad
mortality table Ntabla f de mortalidad

mortality

[mɔːrˈtælɪti] nmortalité fmortality rate n(taux m de) mortalité fmortal sin npéché m mortel

mortality

n
(= mortal state)Sterblichkeit f
(= number of deaths)Todesfälle pl; (= rate)Sterblichkeit(sziffer) f, → Mortalität f (form); mortality rate, rate of mortalitySterbeziffer f, → Sterblichkeitsziffer f, → Mortalität f (form)

mortality

[mɔːˈtælɪtɪ] nmortalità f inv

mortal

(ˈmoːtl) adjective
1. liable to die; unable to live for ever. Man is mortal.
2. of or causing death. a mortal illness; mortal enemies (= enemies willing to fight each other till death); mortal combat.
noun
a human being. All mortals must die sometime.
morˈtality (-ˈtӕ-) noun
1. the state of being mortal.
2. (also mortality rate) the number of deaths in proportion to the population; the death rate. infant mortality.
ˈmortally adverb
in such a way as to cause death. He has been mortally wounded.
mortal sin
(especially in Roman Catholicism) a very serious sin, as a result of which the soul is damned for ever.

mor·tal·i·ty

n. mortalidad, mortandad.
1. estado de ser mortal;
2. índice de mortalidad.

mortality

n mortalidad f; infant — mortalidad infantil
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of egg collection and pre-incubation treatment on blastoderm development and embryonic mortality in ostrich embryos.
At termination of hatching process, unhatched eggs were broken and carefully assorted as infertile, hatched, with embryonic mortality (with dead in shell chicks) and normal chicks.
In conclusion, rates of pregnancy, embryonic mortality, calving, and twinning of repeat breeder Holstein cows did not differ between cows subjected to AI at different times after the onset of spontaneous estrus.
The peroxidation of lipids stored in fertile egg yolk results in reduced available energy for embryonic development and in the formation of toxic compounds, resulting in increased embryonic mortality and consequently decreased egg hatchability.
Moreover, heat stress during early pregnancy in cattle reduces conceptus weight which may lead to embryonic mortality (Biggers et al.
Various hormonal approaches to decrease embryonic mortality.
The second purpose is to determine at which phase during the development do the maternal Se improves the embryonic mortality.
The embryonic mortality during the early period was reported to vary non-significantly (Soliman et al.
Feed composition should not be ignored, she said, because selenium deficiency or too much phosphorus can increase embryonic mortality.
With regard to embryonic mortality, there were differences between treatments (F = 5.
The present study was carried out in the Department of Poultry Science, Veterinary College, Hebbal, Bangalore, Karnataka Veterinary, Animal and Fisheries Sciences University with an objective of assessing the Fertility, Hatchability, Embryonic Mortality, Residues in Egg and Semen Quality parameters of broiler breeder hens fed with aflatoxin and also to evaluate the counteracting effects of bentonite, Spirulina platensis and glucomannan as mycotoxin binding agents.