emend


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emend

to edit or change (a text) to remove errors; to correct: We must emend the text before the book goes to print.
Not to be confused with:
amend – to alter, modify, rephrase; to add or subtract from: Congress may amend the tax bill.
amends – reparation or compensation for a loss, damage, or injury of any kind; recompense; to make amends: He tried to make amends for his rudeness by bringing flowers.

e·mend

 (ĭ-mĕnd′)
tr.v. e·mend·ed, e·mend·ing, e·mends
To improve by critical editing: emend a faulty text.

[Middle English emenden, from Latin ēmendāre : ē-, ex-, ex- + mendum, defect, fault.]

e·mend′er n.

emend

(ɪˈmɛnd)
vb
(Journalism & Publishing) (tr) to make corrections or improvements in (a text) by critical editing
[C15: from Latin ēmendāre to correct, from ē- out + mendum a mistake]
eˈmendable adj

e•mend

(ɪˈmɛnd)

v.t.
1. to edit or change (a text).
2. to revise or correct.
[1375–1425; late Middle English (< Middle French emender) < Latin ēmendāre to correct]
e•mend′a•ble, adj.
e•mend′er, n.
syn: See amend.

emend


Past participle: emended
Gerund: emending

Imperative
emend
emend
Present
I emend
you emend
he/she/it emends
we emend
you emend
they emend
Preterite
I emended
you emended
he/she/it emended
we emended
you emended
they emended
Present Continuous
I am emending
you are emending
he/she/it is emending
we are emending
you are emending
they are emending
Present Perfect
I have emended
you have emended
he/she/it has emended
we have emended
you have emended
they have emended
Past Continuous
I was emending
you were emending
he/she/it was emending
we were emending
you were emending
they were emending
Past Perfect
I had emended
you had emended
he/she/it had emended
we had emended
you had emended
they had emended
Future
I will emend
you will emend
he/she/it will emend
we will emend
you will emend
they will emend
Future Perfect
I will have emended
you will have emended
he/she/it will have emended
we will have emended
you will have emended
they will have emended
Future Continuous
I will be emending
you will be emending
he/she/it will be emending
we will be emending
you will be emending
they will be emending
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been emending
you have been emending
he/she/it has been emending
we have been emending
you have been emending
they have been emending
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been emending
you will have been emending
he/she/it will have been emending
we will have been emending
you will have been emending
they will have been emending
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been emending
you had been emending
he/she/it had been emending
we had been emending
you had been emending
they had been emending
Conditional
I would emend
you would emend
he/she/it would emend
we would emend
you would emend
they would emend
Past Conditional
I would have emended
you would have emended
he/she/it would have emended
we would have emended
you would have emended
they would have emended
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.emend - make improvements or corrections to; "the text was emended in the second edition"
ameliorate, improve, meliorate, amend, better - to make better; "The editor improved the manuscript with his changes"

emend

verb
1. To prepare a new version of:
2. To make right what is wrong:
Translations
يُصَحِّح ، يُنَقِّح
korrigererette
emendierenverbessern
leiîrétta; lagfæra
labot
düzeltmektashih etmek

emend

[ɪˈmend] VTenmendar

emend

[ɪˈmɛnd] vt [+ text] → corriger

emend

vt textverbessern, korrigieren

emend

[ɪˈmɛnd] vt (text) → correggere, emendare

emend

(iːˈmend) verb
to correct errors in (a book etc). The editor emended the manuscript.
ˌemenˈdation noun
References in periodicals archive ?
The New Drug Application filing includes data demonstrating the bioequivalence of CINVANTI to EMEND IV (fosaprepitant), supporting its efficacy for the prevention of both acute and delayed CINV with both moderately emetogenic chemotherapy and highly emetogenic chemotherapy.
"In this analysis, with the addition of Emend, we saw equal protection from nausea and vomiting in both men and women.
In this important book Seiichi Suzuki adumbrates first many of the metrical patterns in Beowulf, the fundamental definitions, and the linguistic uncertainties that have been found problematic ever since the metre of the poem has been discussed systematically: expanded types, svarabhakti vowels, vowel contraction, doubtful stress on prefixes, lines emended metri causa, radical departures from Sievers's types advocated (for example, by Pope or Bliss) for difficult lines including overweighted and expanded lines, the status of the foot, A3 lines and the participation of finite verbs in alliteration and the application of 'Kuhn's (first) Law'.
In conjunction with the trial, the results also showed CINVANTI was better tolerated than EMEND IV, with significantly fewer adverse events reported with CINVANTI, concluded the company.
This leaves only corpora to explain or emend. Since modern women generally apply rouge to their cheeks, it looks as if we would have to emend corpora to some word meaning `cheeks' or `cheekbones', and I have been unable to find any word of the appropriate meaning and metrical shape.
13 May 2011 - US Merck & Co Inc (NYSE: MRK) said yesterday that Health Canada has approved the new intravenous formulation of EMEND IV (fosaprepitant dimeglumine).
It is not a working text of The History of King Lear for ordinary use, since it is expensive and lacks explanatory annotation; nor is it a scholar's text of Q, since it is modernized and frequently emended from F.
EMEND was developed by a subsidiary of Merck & Co Inc and licensed to Ono Pharmaceuticals Co Ltd for the Japanese market.
laid flat on the surface' (OED, [v.sup.I] 4b),(5) appears in the Epistle signed by Middleton: 'and for venery, you shall find enough for sixpence, but well couched an you mark it' (lines 13-14).(6) Citing this use, Gomme emends 'coached' to 'couched' in Laxton's question to the coachman in Gray's Inn Fields: 'May we safely take the upper hand of any coached velvet cap or tuftaffety jacket?' (III.i.13-14).
It is more usual to emend the conclusion of 3.6 to sort out the problem by making the first lord, not the second, E, accompany Bertram to Diana's house.
In their editions, Stevenson, Stratmann, Gadow, Grattan and Sykes, Stanley, and Sauer(4) emend to Nis nan man.(5) But Wells and Atkins give th[er] is.