eminent domain


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

eminent domain

n.
The power of a government to take private property for public use without the owner's consent, provided just compensation is given.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

eminent domain

n
(Law) law the right of a state to confiscate private property for public use, payment usually being made to the owners in compensation
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

em′inent domain′


n.
the power of the state to take private property for public use with payment of compensation to the owner.
[1730–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eminent domain - the right of the state to take private property for public use; the Fifth Amendment that was added to the Constitution of the United States requires that just compensation be made
legal right - a right based in law
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the result in Jackson, eminent domain cannot be used to prevent a holdout problem unless the land is blighted or there is an additional purpose aside from economic development for seizure.
It also was in August that the city became embroiled in lawsuits against some of the biggest banks over eminent domain. And they, too, voiced concern in their court filings that the city has taken big strides toward the use of eminent domain.
The long dormant quasi-public agency, which has eminent domain authority, has been rejuvenated with $500,000 to develop a formal urban renewal plan, the required legal precursor to any eminent domain takings.
Some will not be happy with enabling a private company taking land through eminent domain, Darby said, and people have legitimate concerns about respecting private land.
the power to exercise eminent domain inside a state's borders.
The city of Chicago and bankrupt San Bernardino County, Calif., have proposed the use of eminent domain to seize mortgages and use principal reductions to aid financially troubled homeowners.
Author of the New Hampshire chapter of the new 600-page book, "The Law of Eminent Domain: Fifty State Survey, 2011/2012," he is now with Orr & Reno in Concord where he specializes in real estate development and finance, title insurance, eminent domain, zoning and land use and tax issues.
Miceli's The Economic Theory of Eminent Domain is one of the best and most thorough analyses of the economics of takings to date.
The bill would prohibit federal, state and local governments that receive federal economic development funds from using eminent domain to acquire land for economic development purposes.
Eminent domain is the right of the government to take private property for the public good.
Our goal for the Symposium was to address the state of the law of eminent domain use in New York and to take a fresh look at the ways in which New York's system differs from those of other states.
The papers were first presented at an April 2007 symposium at Florida State University's Law School on the uses and abuses of eminent domain and regulatory takings.