emotional intelligence


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emotional intelligence

n.
Intelligence regarding the emotions, especially in the ability to monitor one's own or others' emotions.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

emotional intelligence

n
(Psychology) awareness of one's own emotions and moods and those of others, esp in managing people
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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There is found Significant Difference between the Mean Stress Scores of Students having High and Low Emotional Intelligence. It means that the students with low and high emotional intelligence have high and low degree of stress in their life respectively.
To measure their intellectual ability, emotional intelligence, and aggression, Draw-A- Person Intellectual Ability Test for children, adolescents, and adults (DAP: IQ), Wong and Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS), and Aggression Questionnaire-Short Form (AQ-12) were administered.
What is emotional intelligence? The international bestselling authors, Travis Bradberry and Jean Greaves, said: 'Emotional intelligence is your ability to recognise and understand emotions in yourself and others, and your ability to use this awareness to manage your behavior and relationships.' This definition begins to paint a clear picture of the subject matter and how important it is to the innovation process.
There is substantial evidence that emotional intelligence is a better predictor of success than intelligence quotient.
The control over emotions is a learned behavior contributed towards a specific form called emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is a skill learned through some activities.
Emotional intelligence is the capacity to understand yourself, to recognize your emotional reactions to situations on the one hand; and to also value and understand the emotions of significant others.
Emotional intelligence training is not meant to remove the emotion from every encounter.
The course, delivered at WCM-Q, featured presentations and workshops on basic concepts in emotional intelligence (EI), methods for EI self-appraisal, understanding and improving self-awareness, developing self-management skills, social awareness, and relationship management.
This study explores whether emotional intelligence will moderate (1) the effect of top management team's heterogeneity on employee turnover rate, lower psychological attachment, and less communication, (2) the effect of conflict-oriented decision making on top management team' harmony, and (3) the effect of an uncertain, complex business environment on top management team's occupational stress.
Given the importance of subjective well-being, substantial research attention has been devoted to this area, with a particular focus on identifying the emotional and behavioral factors that predict subjective well-being--such as emotional intelligence (Gallagher & Vella-Brodrick, 2008; Koydemir & Schiitz, 2012), and altruistic behavior (Theurer & Wister, 2010).
This book explains the importance of emotional intelligence in leadership.