empyrean


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

em·py·re·an

 (ĕm′pī-rē′ən, ĕm-pîr′ē-ən)
n.
1.
a. The highest reaches of heaven, believed by the ancients to be a realm of pure fire or light.
b. The abode of God and the angels; paradise.
2. The sky.
adj.
Of or relating to the empyrean of ancient belief.

[From Medieval Latin empyreum, from empyreus, empyreal; see empyreal.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

empyrean

(ˌɛmpaɪˈriːən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) archaic the highest part of the (supposedly spherical) heavens, thought in ancient times to contain the pure element of fire and by early Christians to be the abode of God and the angels
2. poetic the heavens or sky
adj
3. of or relating to the sky, the heavens, or the empyrean
4. heavenly or sublime
5. archaic composed of fire
[C17: from Medieval Latin empyreus, from Greek empuros fiery, from pur fire]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

em•py•re•an

(ˌɛm pəˈri ən, -paɪ-, ɛmˈpɪr i ən, -ˈpaɪ ri-)

n.
1. the highest heaven, supposed by the ancients to contain the pure element of fire.
2. the visible heavens; the firmament.
adj.
[1605–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.empyrean - the apparent surface of the imaginary sphere on which celestial bodies appear to be projectedempyrean - the apparent surface of the imaginary sphere on which celestial bodies appear to be projected
apex of the sun's way, solar apex, apex - the point on the celestial sphere toward which the sun and solar system appear to be moving relative to the fixed stars
celestial point - a point in the heavens (on the celestial sphere)
nadir - the point below the observer that is directly opposite the zenith on the imaginary sphere against which celestial bodies appear to be projected
surface - the extended two-dimensional outer boundary of a three-dimensional object; "they skimmed over the surface of the water"; "a brush small enough to clean every dental surface"; "the sun has no distinct surface"
zenith - the point above the observer that is directly opposite the nadir on the imaginary sphere against which celestial bodies appear to be projected
zodiac - a belt-shaped region in the heavens on either side to the ecliptic; divided into 12 constellations or signs for astrological purposes
Adj.1.empyrean - of or relating to the sky or heavens; "the empyrean sphere"
2.empyrean - inspiring awe; "well-meaning ineptitude that rises to empyreal absurdity"- M.S.Dworkin; "empyrean aplomb"- Hamilton Basso; "the sublime beauty of the night"
glorious - having or deserving or conferring glory; "a long and glorious career"; "our glorious literature"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Empyrean

[ɛmpɪˈriːən] N the Empyrean (liter) → el empíreo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Empyrean

n the Empyrean (liter)das Empyreum nt (liter)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
But there remain a few undaunted sun-hunters who, in spite of frozen stays and ice-jammed connecting-rods, still haunt the blue empyrean.
Away - away - 'mid seas of rays that roll Empyrean splendor o'er th' unchained soul - The soul that scarce (the billows are so dense) Can struggle to its destin'd eminence - To distant spheres, from time to time, she rode, And late to ours, the favour'd one of God - But, now, the ruler of an anchor'd realm, She throws aside the sceptre - leaves the helm, And, amid incense and high spiritual hymns, Laves in quadruple light her angel limbs.
And rays from God shot down that meteor chain And hallow'd all the beauty twice again, Save when, between th' Empyrean and that ring, Some eager spirit flapp'd his dusky wing.
Spirits in wing, and angels to the view, A thousand seraphs burst th' Empyrean thro', Young dreams still hovering on their drowsy flight - Seraphs in all but "Knowledge," the keen light That fell, refracted, thro' thy bounds, afar O Death !
His thoughts floated then serenely in the empyrean, and he felt towards her the horror that perhaps the painted butterfly, hovering about the flowers, feels to the filthy chrysalis from which it has triumphantly emerged.
He acted as though he were a machine driven by the two forces of his environment and his personality; his reason was someone looking on, observing the facts but powerless to interfere: it was like those gods of Epicurus, who saw the doings of men from their empyrean heights and had no might to alter one smallest particle of what occurred.
The commonplace person begins to play, and shoots into the empyrean without effort, whilst we look up, marvelling how he has escaped us, and thinking how we could worship him and love him, would he but translate his visions into human words, and his experiences into human actions.
High to heaven, Low down to earth, he, seeking everywhere, Floats on the far empyrean, and below The yellow springs; but nowhere in great space Can he find aught of her.
Mean while Warr arose, And fields were fought in Heav'n; wherein remaind (For what could else) to our Almighty Foe Cleer Victory, to our part loss and rout Through all the Empyrean: down they fell Driv'n headlong from the Pitch of Heaven, down Into this Deep, and in the general fall I also; at which time this powerful Key Into my hand was giv'n, with charge to keep These Gates for ever shut, which none can pass Without my op'ning.
"But while our young millionaire dwelt as it were in the Empyrean, something new occurred.
If he is unequal he will presently pass away; but thou art enlarged by thy own shining, and no longer a mate for frogs and worms, dost soar and burn with the gods of the empyrean. It is thought a disgrace to love unrequited.
Empyrean Realms by Taimur Awan is a collection of poems that reflects the lyrical style and diction of Shakespearean sonnets.