en dash

(redirected from en rule)

em dash vs. en dash

There are two similar but distinct punctuation marks called dashes: the en dash () and the em dash (). In appearance, an en dash is slightly longer than a hyphen ( - ), approximately the width of a capital N, while an em dash is slightly longer than an en dash, approximately the width of a capital M (hence their names).
When we refer to dashes, we are usually referring to em dashes, as they are the more common punctuation mark of the two. However, it’s important to know the different ways that each mark is used.
Continue reading...

en·dash

or en dash  (ĕn′dăsh′)
n.
A symbol ( - ) used in writing or printing to connect continuing or inclusive numbers or to connect elements of a compound adjective when either of the elements is an open compound, as 1880-1945 or Princeton-New York trains.

[From its being the width of an n in printing.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

en dash

(ˈɛnˌdæʃ) or

en rule

n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing a dash (–) one en long
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

en′ dash`


n.
Print.
a dash one en long.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
em dash, en dash - The em dash is the long dash used in punctuation whose length is based on the width of the letter M; the en dash is shorter (the width of an N) and the hyphen is even shorter.
See also related terms for punctuation.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
en rule, capitalization, and 'Syllable') Dickinson's poem
In her poem 632, Dickinson uses the en rule "--" instead
use of the en rule in a way that interrupts statements like
Internally, the in-text referencing system, a version of the author-date system that does not use the date, is rather irritating, and the use of hyphens rather than en rules in date and page ranges gives an unfortunate amateurish feel.