enallage


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enallage

(ɪˈnæləɡɪ)
n
(Grammar) the act of using one grammatical form in place of another
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.enallage - a substitution of part of speech or gender or number or tense etc. (e.g., editorial `we' for `I')
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
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We can see examples of enallage of person, erotema or rhetorical question, exclamation or ecphonesis, prosopopeia, aposiopesis, and prolepsis.
The next two chapters deal with William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream in terms of hypallage or, in Puttenham's irresistible locution, "The Changeling," and Ben Jonson's Epicoene in terms of enallage, or (again, Puttenham) "The Figure of Exchange." These two chapters, in my view, clarify the main difference between Mann's work and Parker's: while Parker will trace the spoor of a pun or trope to the end of the chase, regardless of an unknown or improbable outcome, Mann limits the field.
Enraged, Jacobs grabbed the announcer's microphone and shouted to the world, "We was robbed!" Turns out that Jacobs fashioned his patch of rhetorical and oratorical immortality from a Greek figure of speech called enallage, an effective mistake in grammar that drives home an argument.
The figural replacement of one tense by another, whether for purposes of evidential enargeia (vividness) or energeia (expressive vigor) or copia (abundance), was discussed as one species of the umbrella figure of construction called enallage or heterosis (substitution of one part of speech for another) by texts that were hugely influential in France and elsewhere--Erasmus's rhetoric manual De copia (1512) and Thomas Linacre's advanced grammar De emendata structura latini sermonis (1524) (8)--while a grammatical work even more influential than Linacre's, Lorenzo Valla's Elegantiae (first version 1441), also discussed tense-substitution, without giving it a rhetorical label ("tempus [...] pro tempore," one tense for another).
Innovazioni semantiche e originalita espressiva si possono ottenere anche agendo sui rapporti sintattici tra le parole: Apuleio mostra in effetti una certa propensione all'uso dell'enallage, a cui e dedicata l'ultima sezione del volume.
In the first place the application of futilis in such a sense to damnum would entail a bold enallage. Secondly the physical consistency of the offa is not in fact at issue here, but merely the use to which the food will be put.
Parmi lesquels : insertion d'un page de roman (141) ; de journaux (163, 255) ; enallage de personne (155) ; longues enumerations (183), ratures (208-09), signes diacritiques impromptus (les crochets) (213) ; mots disparus blancs ; mots croises (250), et cetera.
Udall is particularly interested in enallage (the substitution of a part of speech for another part of speech), discussed in the second book, and the construction of the noun and pronoun, expounded in the third book (49-52v).
Una mora, tuttavia, tanto importante quanto tenuis, con una scelta aggettivale che sembra voler dilatare il suo significato oltre l'evento specifico; il termine, infatti, esprime in questa occorrenza una certa ambiguita, perche se e senza dubbio corretto intenderlo come attributo qualificativo della pausa di Stilicone in relazione alla misura e al valore, tale quindi da indicarne la brevita temporale, l'insignificanza e, di conseguenza, la piena giustificabilita nel quadro di numerosi e irrinunciabili impegni--e i distici seguenti possono confermare questa direzione interpretativa--, non va esclusa tuttavia una figura di enallage, per cui l'aggettivo proietti la sua semantica non solo sulla mora, ma anche sul nome delle Musae ad esso giustapposte.
Group (g) has a special status: all these examples can be described also as enallage, that is, a figure that connects an adjective not to the entity to which it would naturally be connected but to another entity in some association with the first one, this relationship being possibly "metonymical." Thus, in the first example, it is not Eros who is mad but his victims (that is, the men and women who fall in love)--which means that Eros, strictly speaking, "drives people crazy" but is not crazy at all.
Melanchthon's sparse marginal commentary, which consists primarily of identifications of rhetorical figures, labels the troublesome third-person verb as a "Coniugationis verborum enallage" (enallage of the conjugation of the verb).
The stem of genethliacum is Greek, Gesta Historiale isn't good Latin (367), and we need help with pronouncing enallage and ploce.