prism

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Related to enamel prism: dentin

prism

 (prĭz′əm)
n.
1. A solid figure whose bases or ends have the same size and shape and are parallel to one another, and each of whose sides is a parallelogram.
2. A transparent body of this form, often of glass and usually with triangular ends, used for separating white light passed through it into a spectrum or for reflecting beams of light.
3. A cut-glass object, such as a pendant of a chandelier.
4. A crystal form consisting of three or more similar faces parallel to a single axis.
5. A medium that misrepresents whatever is seen through it.

[Late Latin prīsma, from Greek prīsma, thing sawed off, prism, from prīzein, to saw, variant of prīein.]

prism

(ˈprɪzəm)
n
1. (General Physics) a transparent polygonal solid, often having triangular ends and rectangular sides, for dispersing light into a spectrum or for reflecting and deviating light. They are used in spectroscopes, binoculars, periscopes, etc
2. (General Physics) a form of crystal with faces parallel to the vertical axis
3. (Mathematics) maths a polyhedron having parallel, polygonal, and congruent bases and sides that are parallelograms
[C16: from Medieval Latin prisma, from Greek: something shaped by sawing, from prizein to saw]

prism

(ˈprɪz əm)

n.
1. Optics. a transparent solid body, often having triangular bases, used for dispersing light into a spectrum or for reflecting rays of light.
2. Geom. a solid having bases or ends that are parallel, congruent polygons and sides that are parallelograms.
3. Crystall. a form having faces parallel to the vertical axis and intersecting the horizontal axes.
[1560–70; < Late Latin prīsma < Greek prîsma literally, something sawed, akin to prizein to saw, prístēs sawyer]

prism

(prĭz′əm)
1. A geometric solid whose bases are congruent polygons lying in parallel planes and whose sides are parallelograms.
2. A solid of this type, often made of glass with triangular ends, used to disperse light and break it up into a spectrum.

prism

A transparent, solid object, with at least two plane faces, that bends a light beam and splits it into its component colors.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prism - a polyhedron with two congruent and parallel faces (the bases) and whose lateral faces are parallelogramsprism - a polyhedron with two congruent and parallel faces (the bases) and whose lateral faces are parallelograms
polyhedron - a solid figure bounded by plane polygons or faces
parallelepiped, parallelepipedon, parallelopiped, parallelopipedon - a prism whose bases are parallelograms
quadrangular prism - a prism whose bases are quadrangles
triangular prism - a prism whose bases are triangles
2.prism - optical device having a triangular shape and made of glass or quartzprism - optical device having a triangular shape and made of glass or quartz; used to deviate a beam or invert an image
biprism - an optical device for obtaining interference fringes
erecting prism - a right-angled optical prism used to turn an inverted image upright
optical device - a device for producing or controlling light
prism spectroscope, spectroscope - an optical instrument for spectrographic analysis
telescope, scope - a magnifier of images of distant objects
Translations
مَنشورمَوْشور
hranolprizma
prisme
prisma, strendingurstrendingur
prizmėprizminis
prizma
graniastosłuppryzmat
hranolprizma

prism

[ˈprɪzəm] N (Geom, Tech) → prisma m

prism

[ˈprɪzəm] nprisme m

prism

nPrisma nt

prism

[ˈprɪzm] n (Geom, Tech) → prisma m

prism

(ˈprizm) noun
1. a solid figure whose sides are parallel and whose two ends are the same in shape and size.
2. a glass object of this shape, usually with triangular ends, which breaks up a beam of white light into the colours of the rainbow.
prisˈmatic (-ˈma-) adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
Relationship between fluor concentration and structure pattern of enamel prism in enamel surface after coffee and black tea exposure.
On a microscopic scale, these lesions exhibit disorganised enamel prisms, separated with gaps containing a protein-rich matrix [1, 12-14].
Referring to Fagrell in 2011, enamel in teeth af- fected by MIH exhibits disorganized enamel prisms, a porous structure and loosely packed crystallites.
The reason for the darkening of teeth is reduced enamel thickness which occurs because of wear, trauma and other factors, as a consequence the colour of dentine beneath is reflected on the surface.3 Boyde defined the structure of dental enamel and expounded that crystals are organised within enamel prisms that run from the dentino-enamel junction (DEJ) to the tooth surface.4