enantiomorph

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en·an·ti·o·morph

 (ĭ-năn′tē-ə-môrf′)
[Greek enantios, opposite; see ant- in Indo-European roots + -morph.]

en·an′ti·o·mor′phic, en·an′ti·o·mor′phous adj.
en·an′ti·o·mor′phism n.

enantiomorph

(ɛnˈæntɪəˌmɔːf)
n
either of the two crystal forms of a substance that are mirror images of each other
[C19: from Greek enantios opposite + -morph]
enˌantioˈmorphic, enˌantioˈmorphous adj
enˌantioˈmorphˌism n

en•an•ti•o•morph

(ɪˈnæn ti əˌmɔrf)

n.
either of a pair of chemically identical crystals that are mirror images of each other.
[< German (1856); see enantio-, -morph]
en•an`ti•o•mor′phism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.enantiomorph - either one of a pair of compounds (crystals or molecules) that are mirror images on each other but are not identical
chemical compound, compound - (chemistry) a substance formed by chemical union of two or more elements or ingredients in definite proportion by weight
References in periodicals archive ?
At the beginning of the Third Millennium religious and/or ideological violence contradict Jean-Francois Lyotard's (11) perspective referring to the postmodern disbelief in meta-narrations, as in discussing these enantiomorphic positions legitimate narrative structures are recuperated: the image of saving heroes ("the army of the West", "Islamist extremists", "terrorist groups" etc.
If enantiomorphic flowers occur on one individual, they are often components of a system with pendulum symmetry (Goebel, 1908; Endress, 1999; Kirchoff, 2003; Hardy et al.
Within this heated and disorienting topological space (evocative of Robert Smithson's Enantiomorphic Chambers), the bottle shattered into glowing, spectral fragments of curving glass and printed label.
The subject's responses were coded as F when a facsimile silhouette was chosen and as E when an enantiomorphic silhouette was chosen.
Enantiomorphic "handedness" is revealed by the trapezohedron face x in its right x'{161} or left 'x{151} position (see Figs.
Plants and organic molecules do not invest in bilateral symmetry the way animals do, but they produce many phenomena of interest because of the possibility of enantiomorphic pairs--three-dimensional shapes like the left and right hand which are mirror images of each other but which cannot be rotated to fit in the same space as each other.
Quartz crystals of enormous size can be found in the Alps; they exist in two enantiomorphic forms called "right-handed" and "left-handed," which are mirror images of each other and rotate the plane of polarized light in opposite directions.
The fully shaped enantiomorphic characteristic of a biological object is decisive for subsequent development, and for all the major parameters of living organisms (see figure 13).