enclitic


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Related to enclitic: proclitic

enclitic

Enclitics are reduced or contracted forms of words. They are attached to the word that precedes them by an apostrophe, and they are dependent on that word for their meaning.
Enclitics generally consist of just one consonant sound and cannot stand on their own. In English, they are usually the unstressed forms of functional words such as auxiliary verbs, determiners, participles, and pronouns. As such, they have grammatical rather than lexical meaning (compared with suffixes, which create new words through inflection).
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en·clit·ic

 (ĕn-klĭt′ĭk)
n.
1. A clitic that is attached to the end of another word. In Give 'em the works, the pronoun 'em is an enclitic.
2. A clitic.
adj.
Of or relating to an enclitic or enclisis; forming an accentual unit with the preceding word.

[Late Latin encliticus, from Greek enklitikos, from enklīnein, to lean on : en-, on, in; see en-2 + klīnein, to lean; see klei- in Indo-European roots.]

en·clit′i·cize′ (-ə-sīz′) v.
en·clit′i·ci·za′tion (-ə-sĭ-zā′shən), en′clis·is (-klĭs-ĭs) n.

enclitic

(ɪnˈklɪtɪk)
adj
(Linguistics)
a. denoting or relating to a monosyllabic word or form that is treated as a suffix of the preceding word, as Latin -que in populusque
b. (in classical Greek) denoting or relating to a word that throws an accent back onto the preceding word
n
(Linguistics) an enclitic word or linguistic form
[C17: from Late Latin encliticus, from Greek enklitikos, from enklinein to cause to lean, from en-2 + klinein to lean]
enˈclitically adv

en•clit•ic

(ɛnˈklɪt ɪk)

adj.
1. (of a word) closely connected in pronunciation with the preceding word and not having an independent accent or phonological status.
n.
2. an enclitic word, as the form of are in we're.
[1650–60; < Late Latin encliticus < Greek enklitikós <*énclit(os), v. adj. of enklinein to cause to lean on (en- en-2 + klinein to lean1)]
Translations

enclitic

[ɪnˈklɪtɪk] ADJenclítico

enclitic

nEnklitikon nt

enclitic

[ɪnˈklɪtɪk] adjenclitico/a
References in periodicals archive ?
The optional nature of the proclitic 'r is in fact rather an important way in which the preverbal particle contrasts with the article enclitic 'r: as we have noted, the latter cannot typically be considered optional, since it takes precedence over the other two forms of the article.
Suk 53a Enlow 270 which is an adjective with an enclitic pronominal ending; see Noldeke 1875: 87-88.
O mira virtus ingeni, / Novumque monstrum" is translated "O new born, wonderful and virtuous entity [or monster/creature]" (25), where every word is misconstrued: the noun virtus is mistaken for an adjective modifying monstrum, ingenium and the enclitic que are omitted, and although monstrum ("prodigy" or "miracle") in other circumstances could refer to a "monster," it is incomprehensible what beast would be referred to in this poem; it follows that "new born" should be just "new.
Moreover, the only reason for this hypothesis is the uncommon use of the enclitic -mi (1.
In the first instance the phrase is called proclitic; the phrase leans, as it were, to the right, as in thy own bright EYES, and in the second case the phrase is called enclitic, it leans to the left, as in Within thy OWN bud .
One possibility is that T corresponds to the enclitic =arl, as assumed by the glossing so far.
I am unable to see how Yasomatiti (the proper name attached to the enclitic quotative iti to mark the title) could betray a Prakrit origin.
Words accompanied by specific markers of the Romanian language, such as enclitic definite articles, suffixes in proper family names, vocatives, diminutives;
The second person plural pronoun can occur in the subject position before the verb as in (14) or as an enclitic after the verb as in (15) below.
In some dialects of Imperia, Liguria, imperative phrases consisting of a verb plus enclitic pronoun(s) can be pronounced with stress in various positions: on the verb, or on the penultimate or final syllable of the phrase.
In these dialects, possessive constructions with kinship terms (and a few other nouns, such as casa) are also unique, since the possessive is enclitic to the noun and the definite article does not appear.
When the borrowed word is inflected, its original form is preserved but linked by hyphen to enclitic morphemes to individualize and mark it as 'foreign', e.