encode


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en·code

 (ĕn-kōd′)
v. en·cod·ed, en·cod·ing, en·codes
v.tr.
1. To convert (a message or other information) into code.
2. To format (electronic data) according to a standard format.
3. Genetics To specify the genetic code for (a protein, for example).
v.intr.
1. To convert information into code.
2. To format electronic data according to a standard format.
3. Genetics To specify the genetic code for a protein.

en·cod′er n.

encode

(ɪnˈkəʊd)
vb (tr)
1. (Communications & Information) to convert (a message) from plain text into code
2. (Computer Science) computing to convert (characters and symbols) into a digital form as a series of impulses. Compare decode2
3. (Broadcasting) to convert (an electrical signal) into a form suitable for transmission
4. (Psychology) to convert (a nerve signal) into a form that can be received by the brain
5. (Linguistics) to use (a word, phrase, etc, esp of a foreign language) in the construction appropriate to it in that language
enˈcodement n
enˈcoder n

en•code

(ɛnˈkoʊd)

v.t. -cod•ed, -cod•ing.
to convert (information, a message, etc.) into code.
[1930–35]
en•cod′a•ble, adj.
en•code′ment, n.
en•cod′er, n.

encode


Past participle: encoded
Gerund: encoding

Imperative
encode
encode
Present
I encode
you encode
he/she/it encodes
we encode
you encode
they encode
Preterite
I encoded
you encoded
he/she/it encoded
we encoded
you encoded
they encoded
Present Continuous
I am encoding
you are encoding
he/she/it is encoding
we are encoding
you are encoding
they are encoding
Present Perfect
I have encoded
you have encoded
he/she/it has encoded
we have encoded
you have encoded
they have encoded
Past Continuous
I was encoding
you were encoding
he/she/it was encoding
we were encoding
you were encoding
they were encoding
Past Perfect
I had encoded
you had encoded
he/she/it had encoded
we had encoded
you had encoded
they had encoded
Future
I will encode
you will encode
he/she/it will encode
we will encode
you will encode
they will encode
Future Perfect
I will have encoded
you will have encoded
he/she/it will have encoded
we will have encoded
you will have encoded
they will have encoded
Future Continuous
I will be encoding
you will be encoding
he/she/it will be encoding
we will be encoding
you will be encoding
they will be encoding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been encoding
you have been encoding
he/she/it has been encoding
we have been encoding
you have been encoding
they have been encoding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been encoding
you will have been encoding
he/she/it will have been encoding
we will have been encoding
you will have been encoding
they will have been encoding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been encoding
you had been encoding
he/she/it had been encoding
we had been encoding
you had been encoding
they had been encoding
Conditional
I would encode
you would encode
he/she/it would encode
we would encode
you would encode
they would encode
Past Conditional
I would have encoded
you would have encoded
he/she/it would have encoded
we would have encoded
you would have encoded
they would have encoded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.encode - convert information into code; "encode pictures digitally"
convert - change the nature, purpose, or function of something; "convert lead into gold"; "convert hotels into jails"; "convert slaves to laborers"
cypher, encipher, encrypt, cipher, write in code, code, inscribe - convert ordinary language into code; "We should encode the message for security reasons"
decipher, decode, decrypt - convert code into ordinary language

encode

verb encrypt, code, scramble, garble, make unintelligible, encipher, put into code The sender uses a secret key to encode the message.
Translations
يُشَفِّر، يَضَعُ في رُموز سِرِّيَّه
kode
iekodetkodet
zakódovaťzašifrovať
kodlamakşifrelemek

encode

[ɪnˈkəʊd] VT
1. (= encrypt) → codificar, cifrar
2. (Ling) → cifrar

encode

[ɪnˈkəʊd] vt (= encrypt) [+ information, data, message] → coder

encode

vt (also Comput) → codieren

encode

[ɪnˈkəʊd] vtcodificare

encode

(inˈkoud) verb
to put into (secret, computer etc) code.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since launching in 2003, ENCODE has funded a network of researchers to develop and apply methods for mapping candidate functional elements in the genome, and to analyze the enormous database of generated genomic information.
Sample Digital's services range from its digital dailies, which encode the day's work done on film sets and transmits them through a private delivery system for viewing by the film's executives, crew and cast in screening rooms, on computers and on their own home, office or hotel televisions via a special, dedicated, set top box; to encoding films, clips and trailers for viewing on computers, televisions, iPods and cell phones via video on demand, cable TV service and Internet feeds.
Fourth, all H2N2 sequences are monophyletic and encode an intact PB1-F2.
"The ultimate goal of the ENCODE project is to create a reference work that will help researchers fully utilize the human sequence to gain a deeper understanding of human biology, as well as to develop new strategies for preventing and treating disease," says Elise A.
mPress encodes video in realtime into MPEG1 or MPEG2 streams, CBR (Constant Bit Rate) or VBR (Variable Bit Rate), from 128kb/s up to 15Mb/s, scalable up to Full-D1 resolution NTSC or PAL.
Data conversion occurs now between USMARC and SGML, and it is possible the need to encode bibliographic data in library systems in only one format may be relaxed.
Bar-code technology is quite simple: The printed lines encode data such as a product's price, warehouse location, manufacturing date or almost any other information specific to the item they identify.
Dynamic Huffman encoding, on the other hand, reads each text twice; once to determine the frequency distribution of the characters in the text and once to encode the data.
Designed for the most demanding real-time applications, the Makito X4 can encode and stream broadcast video with 10-bit pixel depth and 4:2:2 chroma subsampling.
The isolate was subsequently characterized by ribotyping (4) and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of genes that encode production of toxins A and B (5).
In a third report, scientists show how patterns of activity in the genes that encode microRNA reveal signatures that doctors might someday use to identify a tumor's origin.