encomiast

(redirected from encomiasts)

en·co·mi·ast

 (ĕn-kō′mē-ăst′, -əst)
n.
A person who delivers or writes an encomium; a eulogist.

[Greek enkōmiastēs, from enkōmiazein, to praise, from enkōmion, encomium; see encomium.]

en·co′mi·as′tic (-ăs′tĭk), en·co′mi·as′ti·cal (-tĭ-kəl) adj.

encomiast

(ɛnˈkəʊmɪˌæst)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a person who speaks or writes an encomium
[C17: from Greek enkōmiastēs, from enkōmiazein to utter an encomium]
enˌcomiˈastic, enˌcomiˈastical adj
enˌcomiˈastically adv

en•co•mi•ast

(ɛnˈkoʊ miˌæst, -əst)

n.
a person who utters or writes an encomium; eulogist.
[1600–10; < Greek]
en•co`mi•as′tic, adj.
en•co`mi•as′ti•cal•ly, adv.
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References in periodicals archive ?
not crowding into mistresses' blouses or encomiasts' paradoxes
Rampant mobility--which from the Goods Roads movement to the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways was a Big Government project, lest encomiasts of the Open Road forget-undermined family, church, community, and neighborliness.
(2) Clarence Brown claims that the Acmeists were "if one can use without pejorative sense a word that would gratify their directors, encomiasts of the status quo.
His party and the state institutions were filled with corrupted people and encomiasts. And the man went too far.
It often provided the major encomiasts of the Royal Society with a convenient argument for the warranting of excessive labour, on the basis of which objectivity was being formulated.
In their different ways the encomiasts agree that Four Lectures is a work precisely and adequately responsive to its time, very much what was being said about dozens of other variously scrambled works then being published.
The encomiasts of Desportes in Premieres oeuvres also included Jean Dorat, and the popular poet Jean-Antoine de Baif; both were part of Villeroy's and l'Aubespine's circle.
But if these hymns free the speaker to cry "Amen" in solidarity with other encomiasts, they also cast him in a satiric light, as the only "unlettered" clerk among a host of golden pens.
However, now this defensiveness is caught between a concern for spectacle continuous with nineteenth-century 'official nationalism' and a new self-consciousness--a certain kind of postnationalism that only feels comfortable in using the flattering images of encomiasts and creative consultants to project an image of itself to itself.
On this subject, see Erwin Panofsky's enlightening remarks: "If the encomiasts of Francis I, before and after his death, were hardly able to pronounce his name without acclaiming him as a `dispeller of ignorance' they did not indulge in empty flattery.
Annette Tomarken remarks on the self-conscious literariness of the flea's encomiasts as follows: "The contributors all wished to transform a mundane, even embarrassing incident into complimentary literary creations that would demonstrate both poetic skill and a desire to please a learned society lady.
9.2.69f.) in the context of (1 unconvertibel words in Greek Characte that the other objections raised against the extraordinary claims of the proem rest rather on subjective feelings of incredulity than on due consideration of the topoi available to contemporary encomiasts. The extravagance of the medium, with the high value it placed on sheer outrageousness of idea and expression alike, will always be alien in some measure to the modern reader.